Greg Galitzine : Greg Galitzine's VoIP Authority Blog
Greg Galitzine

Technology

FCC Answers to Congress

April 15, 2008

Xangati Helps Front Line Agents

March 25, 2008

Xangati has announced Virtual Task Manager solution, a rapid problem identification application that can be deployed right to the front line support groups in either enterprise or service provider settings.   Previously the ability to drill down to help solve a customer complaint was reserved for senior level agents and managers. The new solution enables the first tier of customer support — those who actually field the complaint calls — to have visibility into a customer’s network and what the subscribers are doing at any given time.   This enables them to rapidly get to the heart of the customer complaint, which has several benefits, including a reduction in the total number of customer service calls, less time spent on the phone with each caller, fewer truck rolls to resolve issues and reduced customer churn as a result of happier, more satisfied customers.   For more, check out this article, or visit Xangati online.

Xangati Helps Front Line Agents

March 25, 2008

Xangati has announced Virtual Task Manager solution, a rapid problem identification application that can be deployed right to the front line support groups in either enterprise or service provider settings.   Previously the ability to drill down to help solve a customer complaint was reserved for senior level agents and managers. The new solution enables the first tier of customer support — those who actually field the complaint calls — to have visibility into a customer’s network and what the subscribers are doing at any given time.   This enables them to rapidly get to the heart of the customer complaint, which has several benefits, including a reduction in the total number of customer service calls, less time spent on the phone with each caller, fewer truck rolls to resolve issues and reduced customer churn as a result of happier, more satisfied customers.   For more, check out this article, or visit Xangati online.

Super Specs Solve Search Stress

March 14, 2008

The UK’s Daily Mail has a report on intelligent glasses that help wearers locate frequently mislaid items like car keys, cell phones, and the like.   The specs — developed by Japanese researchers under the tutelage of Professor Kuniyoshi at the University of Tokyo — feature a built in camera, display screen and computer brain which aid in finding misplaced objects.   Professor Kuniyoshi thinks these glasses might revolutionize the lives of people who suffer from memory problems.   According to the Daily Mail:   The Smart Goggles contain a compact video camera which films everything the wearer looks at — and a viewfinder which fits snugly in front of the right lens.   The glasses are connected to a small, but smart computer processor worn on the back which can learn to recognize shapes extremely quickly.   To use the glasses, the wearer first wanders around a house or workplace for an hour or so, looking at the objects he or she may later want to find in a hurry.   Each time the camera focuses on a object — such as a set of keys, a mobile phone or a purse — the wearer says the name aloud.

Google Reassures On Information Security

March 10, 2008

What’s tomorrow’s headline going to be?   Google had a post on their Official Google Blog today by Douglas Merrill, VP of Engineering. The post is titled How Google keeps your information secure, and is all about the effort Google puts into protecting your personal information.   According to Merrill, “…we take security very seriously, and that's why we have some of the best engineers in the world working here to secure information. Much of their work is confidential, but we do want to share some of the ways we're protecting your data.”   He goes on to discuss Google’s philosophy, the technology that they employ to ensure that information is protected, and the processes that the company employs to secure your private bits and bytes. Of course Merrill touts his co-workers as some of the “best and brightest security engineers in the world,” and points out that Google uses a lot of their own technology in-house, the old, “we eat our own dog food” pledge.   I wonder what happened that made Google go to the effort of explaining their security policy in their blog today, a blog entry replete with links to their already existing security policy.   I like to be assured that my private information will remain private.

All You Need Is… $600 Mil?

March 10, 2008

Digg on the Block? Again?

March 7, 2008

As far as rumors go, this one has been heard before, but that’s not to say that one of these times, it won’t actually come to fruition.   Tech Crunch’s Michael Arrington writes that Digg is on the block again and that several companies —Microsoft, Google, and two “media/news companies” — are close to making offers.   Arrington reports that Digg might be willing to let itself go for less than the $300 million price tag that investment bank Allen &Co. were suggesting last year.   The march to own the hearts and minds (and of course page views) continues. Will it be Google? Will it be Microsoft?   It’s odd how perceptions change over time. Remember when Microsoft was considered to be pure evil, and Google was the up and coming, cute and cuddly upstart?   And now?   Is it just me, or is there a slowly rising tide of support for Microsoft to act as a counterbalance to the Google total assimilation machine?

The Internet's Broken

March 5, 2008

Google Gets Into Healthcare

February 29, 2008

I was down in Orlando this week for the annual HIMMS (Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society) conference and exhibition, a show dedicated to transforming healthcare through IT.   This is a new space for me, so I attended with the view of taking in as much as I possibly could in the short time I had at the show. I’d also like to send a great big thank you out to Michael Carr of IgeaCare, who took the time to shepherd me around the event.   I’ll be writing more about my experience in an upcoming issue of Internet Telephony and of course here on TMCnet, but I wanted to get a quick post in about something Google is doing on the healthcare front.   Last week Google announced a partnership with the Cleveland Clinic, a large academic medical center centered around giving patients access to their own medical records.   The pilot is open to just a few thousand patients to start, but Google is collaborating with a number of insurance plans, medical groups, pharmacies and hospitals to see the project through.   Writing on the Official Google Blog, Alan Newberger, Engineering Manager, expressed his view that the pilot was a key initiative. “I see it as an important first step to show how Google can help users get access to their medical records and take charge of their health information,” he wrote.   CEO Eric Schmidt gave the closing keynote at HIMMS, and he spoke publicly for the first time about Google’s overall health strategy.   According to Google’s Marissa Mayer, VP, Search & User Products, “Google Health aims to solve an urgent need that dovetails with our overall mission of organizing patient information and making it accessible and useful.

Google Targets Microsoft Collaboration Suite

February 28, 2008

Google is taking aim at Microsoft’s SharePoint.   Google announced Wednesday it will begin offering an easy to use Web site creation and publishing tool for office workers to set up and run collaboration sites, for quickly sharing information among project teams and co workers.   Google Sites, as the new site publishing service is known, is based on the acquisition 16 months ago of hosted wiki provider JotSpot.   The new service is designed to allow teams of users to organize and share digital information such as Web links, calendars, photos, videos, presentations, attachments and other documents in an easy-to-maintain site, with the goal of increasing productivity among the team members.   Of course, Microsoft’s dominance in this market (some pundits see SharePoint as a billion-dollar business for Microsoft) is not to be taken lightly, but when it comes to contenders, Google is no slouch, and is in fact the biggest thorn in Microsoft’s side on so many other fronts it almost comes as no surprise that they would be launching a would-be competitor to SharePoint now.   Aside from functionality, the key difference between the offerings is cost, with Google offering their Google Sites free of charge to users of Google Apps, which in turn is less expensive than many Microsoft tools.   As usual in any battle between companies of this scale, it remains to be seen what the impact will be on the other players (think zoho) in the market and in the end, we need to ask ourselves this: Will today’s announcement help businesses maximize their productivity in the long run?
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