Rich Tehrani : Communications and Technology Blog - Tehrani.com
Rich Tehrani
CEO
| Communications and Technology Blog - Latest news in IP communications, telecom, VoIP, call center & CRM space

When Does WebRTC Need a Media Server? Reason #7

Tsahi Levent-Levi’s white paper, “Seven Reasons for WebRTC Server-Side Processing,” details a variety of WebRTC-related scenarios that necessitate a media server....

Full Story »

How signaling spikes affect networks: 3 real-world examples

By: Josee Loudiadis, Director of Network Intelligence, Alcatel-Lucent

Data and signaling growth are usually good news for network operators, since growth often translates into higher revenues. But when growth is averaged over a month or quarter, the daily highs and lows of network activity are smoothed out. And signaling spikes remain hidden within the averages. These spikes can overwhelm available signaling capacity, which impairs the customer experience, as well as the operator’s reputation.

What happens when a spike occurs? Typically, a CPU Overload alarm appears on various mobile nodes. And the Network Operations Center (NOC) immediately starts praying that the burst is short-lived and doesn’t go over maximum peak-rate capacity. Because when that happens, all consumers are denied service access. Then, the process of identifying the source of the problem begins. This can be arduous, because it often involves applications completely out of NOC control. And the issue can’t be resolved easily without solid network analytics that enables engagement with application and device developers.

That’s the reason signaling information is a crucial part of the Alcatel-Lucent Mobile Apps Rankings report and why LTE World 2014 devotes an entire pre-conference day to the topic. It’s also why this blog offers a closer look at how some real-world disruptive signaling spikes got started — and were finally resolved.

Full Story »

The Expanding Channel Programs

Not only do I see more cloud service providers looking to the channel for sales, I see other channel programs expanding....

Full Story »

When Does WebRTC Need a Media Server? Reason #6

In a recent blog about the current state of WebRTC, I mentioned that readers should check out an excellent white paper...

Full Story »

The Six Degrees of Mobile Data Plan Innovation: It's Not All About Data- Mobile Voice and Messaging Share Plans Offer Plenty of Appeal

Alcatel-Lucent’s Rich Crowe continues the Six Degrees of Mobile Data Plan Innovation blog series by examining the degree to which consumers are interested in share plans that include unlimited voice and messaging but don’t include data.

The last Six Degrees blog explored consumer attitudes toward two different mobile share plan options: sharing data only and sharing voice, messaging and data. This blog will explore attitudes toward a 3rd option: sharing unlimited voice and messaging — but not data — across multiple devices or subscribers.

Full Story »

200G Optical Networks: What you need to know

By: Earl Kennedy, IP Transport Product Marketing, Alcatel-Lucent

Optical network operators have already made the move to 100G. But skyrocketing bandwidth demand means many are already pondering what’s next. With a 200G optical solution hitting the market, you probably have questions about when to move to 200G optical – and what you need to know when you make that move.

Full Story »

Zocalo: Amazon Just Fired a Gun at Microsoft, Oracle and Dropbox

Amazon has made its name in ecommerce and cloud but its next frontier may be productivity applications and in the process, they...

Full Story »

RIP Amar Bose

July 12, 2013


In many ways Dr. Amar Bose deserves as much credit for revolutionizing audio as Steve Jobs received for revolutionizing numerous industries from movies to smartphones. Bose was one of the first to take high-end audio mainstream – you could find the company’s gear at virtually every audio store in the 1980s when most other stereo equipment was more segmented between high-end and lower quality.

My first encounter with the company was before 1980 where I saw an ad for the company’s direct-reflecting 901 speakers. I was a kid but I decided at the time that I needed to buy these speakers.

Why I'm Almost Able to Recommend You Ditch iPhone E-mail for Boxer

July 12, 2013

The Boxer email client for iOS may be one of the better productivity tools you will find as it is easier to use in many ways than the native iOS e-mail app on the iPhone. I’ve been using Boxer for some months now and until the most recent version, 2.6.0, I didn’t feel comfortable recommending it. What has changed is the support of landscape mode when composing messages.

Perhaps the most important benefit of the app is the ability swipe a message to delete it while having a quick undelete available until you take another action within the app.

Why Apple Dropped its App Store Name Fight With Amazon

July 10, 2013

In January 2011, I wrote about my belief that an app store is an app store and both the terms app and store are generic meaning together they become yet another generic term. Certainly the nuances of the legal system make my assertion a bit basic but having lived through a similar lawsuit which was eventually settled based on the fact the plaintiff must have realized the terms they were suing over were generic as well.

At the time, the post I penned was about Microsoft being sued by Apple for using the term app store – then more recently I wrote about Apple suing Amazon over their use of the same term for their store.

My feeling was the case would settle with Apple using “Apple App Store” & Amazon using “Amazon App Store.” Seems the case “settled” without the need for this to happen as the parties agreed to walk away from the suit which is really a smart move on Apple’s part because it is really difficult to prove app store is not generic when going up against Amazon’s virtually unlimited legal funds.

Americans Don't Know They Want Wearable Tech Yet

July 8, 2013

Recently a headline stating that most Americans don’t want wearable tech caught my eye and reminded me of many past of articles regarding consumer choices which were just plain wrong. The piece can be summed up with the following paragraph:

The April telephone poll of 1,011 Americans 18 and older found that only 34 percent of those polled who make $100,000 or more a year would consider buying or wearing a consumer-grade smart watch or smart glasses. For those with a significantly smaller income, $35,000 annually, the percentage of those interested in the technology increases to 47 percent.

The implication of the headline is the wearable market will remain a niche and while this could very well be the case, the reality is consumers and analysts have no idea where markets which haven’t been invented yet will be in the future.

How The Prism Leak Will Hurt US Tech Companies

July 4, 2013

Now that the world is aware of NSA's Prism program where there seems to be unfettered access to the servers of American web firms, we can expect a brave new world of communications and technology competition.

Although it isn't accurate to say there is free trade in the world due to tariffs and fees imposed across the borders of various countries, for the most part, companies easily can sell their wares across the world without having to worry about excess nationalism.

Yes there are exceptions but over time, consumers worldwide are OK with buying products from companies located virtually anywhere. Perhaps this is best exemplified by the popularity of American cars in China and the popularity of German, Japanese and recently Korean cars in the US.

This situation may change in the future as heads of state across the world are beginning to advise their citizens to stay clear of American tech companies if they don't want to be snooped on.

Apple's YSL Hire Means iWearable Tech is Coming

July 3, 2013

Many believe wearable technology will do to tablets and smartphones what they did to laptops and PCs. There is certainly high probability that at a minimum, today’s mobile devices will lose large amounts of share to computers you wear. The problem however for tech a company is making a computing device you want to place on your person. Some believe Google’s Glass product is too ugly to wear for example.

This explains why Google is working with Warby Parker and why Apple just hired Yves Saint Laurent CEO Paul Deneve to manage “special projects.”



You Say You Want (to watch) a Revolution

July 3, 2013

The Arab Spring has brought about a number of revolutions and protests but perhaps the most amazing part of living in a connected world is that anyone can watch it in real-time on the web. Of course none of this is new – video on the web certainly isn’t but the ability to sit at work and see millions of protesters a world away in Egypt sometimes has the ability to amaze even me.

Another point worth making is the ability to access such streams means protests can get larger as many people will only get involved once critical mass has been reached.

This is what I’ve been watching if you want to have a look at the live stream yourself.



 

How Nordstrom Has Adopted The Latest Technology

July 2, 2013

For about two decades we have heard about the death of brick-and-mortar at the hands of technology like the Internet but Nordstrom’s is one retailer who seems to be embracing many aspects of technology in order to boost sales not only online but in its stores. For example, in May of this year it was revealed that the company was working with a company called Euclid in order to track customer movements throughout the store using the company’s WiFi network.



In February of 2007, the company acquired online flash sales site HauteLook for $180 million and more recently rolled out a HauteLook app which has accelerated the company’s sales.

In the online world, Nordstrom is doing well with over four million Pinterest followers.

HP Proves That Samsung, Apple and Google Will Win in Hardware

July 1, 2013

At one point in time HP had the best combination of mobile devices anywhere. They owned their own line of PDAs and also purchased Compaq who made the IPAQ – a game-changing device if there ever was one. The thing I liked about the IPAQ versus the Palm 7 which was a competitive device released around the same time was that COMPAQ decided to forego battery life for a bright color screen. In many ways the iPhone 5 reminds me of the first IPAQ device – especially when it prematurely runs out of battery power.



MDM is Just too Small a Market for Apple

July 1, 2013

It is no secret that MDM is a huge market and Apple is in large part responsible for the trend where non-Microsoft and non-Blackberry devices infiltrated the enterprise. Moreover, corporate IT departments have huge budgets so if Apple came out with an MDM solution it could do exceedingly well in the market.

Writing for TMCnet, Joe Rizzo asks why Apple isn't in this market and he makes some good points.

You have to wonder however the predicament Cupertino is in at the moment.

Featured Events