Rich Tehrani : Communications and Technology Blog - Tehrani.com
Rich Tehrani
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| Communications and Technology Blog - Latest news in IP communications, telecom, VoIP, call center & CRM space

Peter's View: The Channel Ecosystem

I read CRAIG'S VIEW: THE NEW CHANNEL ECOSYSTEM by Craig Schlagbaum, channel chief at Comcast. My response was too long for...

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2 Ways to Maximize Your Vendor Relationship

As channel partners, we get hammered all the time to sell vendor's stuff - even if it is unreasonable or doesn't...

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The Changing Definition of the Diameter Signaling Controller and Diameter Routing Agent (DRA)

Next week, I will be speaking at the Signaling Focus Day of LTE Asia.  The signaling focus day obviously will have...

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The Cat Video Index: A Simple View of Data Costs

By: Andy Porter, Product Manager in the Payment, Policy and Charging department at Alcatel-Lucent

The Economist has its famous Big Mac index for comparing buying power across countries. But I wanted an index that focuses on the cost of mobile data usage. That meant I had to find a data-charging equivalent of the Big Mac. I needed an item that crosses cultural boundaries, is universally understood and is available worldwide.

I considered many possibilities. But the answer arrived when I saw my daughter laughing at a video of a cat playing a piano. Obviously, the mobile data equivalent of the Big Mac is the YouTube video. It’s a universally available service that is easily measured in quantitative terms, making it ideal for comparing mobile data costs.

In honor of my daughter, I chose the classic “piano-playing cat” as the baseline video. And by the way, this cat video has been viewed over 34 million times, proving its suitability as a baseline.

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THE SECRET VALUE OF VoLTE - WHAT'S IN IT FOR CONSUMERS

By: Ed Elkin, Director, IP Platforms Marketing, Alcatel-Lucent 

Today’s consumers want faster mobile broadband, and lots of it. That’s the dominant fact shaping Mobile Service Providers’ competitive strategies. So let’s look at what you can offer these valuable subscribers with voice over LTE (VoLTE).

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California Lawmakers Plunge Some Transactions into 3rd World

California has come up with a law that hurts the very people it says it is protecting by making it difficult to...

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Globys Uses the Power of Social to Boost Carrier Sales

You may recall a commercial for Faberge Organic shampoo from decades back where the person using the shampoo said when you...

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Why I'm Almost Able to Recommend You Ditch iPhone E-mail for Boxer

July 12, 2013

The Boxer email client for iOS may be one of the better productivity tools you will find as it is easier to use in many ways than the native iOS e-mail app on the iPhone. I’ve been using Boxer for some months now and until the most recent version, 2.6.0, I didn’t feel comfortable recommending it. What has changed is the support of landscape mode when composing messages.

Perhaps the most important benefit of the app is the ability swipe a message to delete it while having a quick undelete available until you take another action within the app.

Why Apple Dropped its App Store Name Fight With Amazon

July 10, 2013

In January 2011, I wrote about my belief that an app store is an app store and both the terms app and store are generic meaning together they become yet another generic term. Certainly the nuances of the legal system make my assertion a bit basic but having lived through a similar lawsuit which was eventually settled based on the fact the plaintiff must have realized the terms they were suing over were generic as well.

At the time, the post I penned was about Microsoft being sued by Apple for using the term app store – then more recently I wrote about Apple suing Amazon over their use of the same term for their store.

My feeling was the case would settle with Apple using “Apple App Store” & Amazon using “Amazon App Store.” Seems the case “settled” without the need for this to happen as the parties agreed to walk away from the suit which is really a smart move on Apple’s part because it is really difficult to prove app store is not generic when going up against Amazon’s virtually unlimited legal funds.

Americans Don't Know They Want Wearable Tech Yet

July 8, 2013

Recently a headline stating that most Americans don’t want wearable tech caught my eye and reminded me of many past of articles regarding consumer choices which were just plain wrong. The piece can be summed up with the following paragraph:

The April telephone poll of 1,011 Americans 18 and older found that only 34 percent of those polled who make $100,000 or more a year would consider buying or wearing a consumer-grade smart watch or smart glasses. For those with a significantly smaller income, $35,000 annually, the percentage of those interested in the technology increases to 47 percent.

The implication of the headline is the wearable market will remain a niche and while this could very well be the case, the reality is consumers and analysts have no idea where markets which haven’t been invented yet will be in the future.

How The Prism Leak Will Hurt US Tech Companies

July 4, 2013

Now that the world is aware of NSA's Prism program where there seems to be unfettered access to the servers of American web firms, we can expect a brave new world of communications and technology competition.

Although it isn't accurate to say there is free trade in the world due to tariffs and fees imposed across the borders of various countries, for the most part, companies easily can sell their wares across the world without having to worry about excess nationalism.

Yes there are exceptions but over time, consumers worldwide are OK with buying products from companies located virtually anywhere. Perhaps this is best exemplified by the popularity of American cars in China and the popularity of German, Japanese and recently Korean cars in the US.

This situation may change in the future as heads of state across the world are beginning to advise their citizens to stay clear of American tech companies if they don't want to be snooped on.

Apple's YSL Hire Means iWearable Tech is Coming

July 3, 2013

Many believe wearable technology will do to tablets and smartphones what they did to laptops and PCs. There is certainly high probability that at a minimum, today’s mobile devices will lose large amounts of share to computers you wear. The problem however for tech a company is making a computing device you want to place on your person. Some believe Google’s Glass product is too ugly to wear for example.

This explains why Google is working with Warby Parker and why Apple just hired Yves Saint Laurent CEO Paul Deneve to manage “special projects.”



You Say You Want (to watch) a Revolution

July 3, 2013

The Arab Spring has brought about a number of revolutions and protests but perhaps the most amazing part of living in a connected world is that anyone can watch it in real-time on the web. Of course none of this is new – video on the web certainly isn’t but the ability to sit at work and see millions of protesters a world away in Egypt sometimes has the ability to amaze even me.

Another point worth making is the ability to access such streams means protests can get larger as many people will only get involved once critical mass has been reached.

This is what I’ve been watching if you want to have a look at the live stream yourself.



 

How Nordstrom Has Adopted The Latest Technology

July 2, 2013

For about two decades we have heard about the death of brick-and-mortar at the hands of technology like the Internet but Nordstrom’s is one retailer who seems to be embracing many aspects of technology in order to boost sales not only online but in its stores. For example, in May of this year it was revealed that the company was working with a company called Euclid in order to track customer movements throughout the store using the company’s WiFi network.



In February of 2007, the company acquired online flash sales site HauteLook for $180 million and more recently rolled out a HauteLook app which has accelerated the company’s sales.

In the online world, Nordstrom is doing well with over four million Pinterest followers.

HP Proves That Samsung, Apple and Google Will Win in Hardware

July 1, 2013

At one point in time HP had the best combination of mobile devices anywhere. They owned their own line of PDAs and also purchased Compaq who made the IPAQ – a game-changing device if there ever was one. The thing I liked about the IPAQ versus the Palm 7 which was a competitive device released around the same time was that COMPAQ decided to forego battery life for a bright color screen. In many ways the iPhone 5 reminds me of the first IPAQ device – especially when it prematurely runs out of battery power.



MDM is Just too Small a Market for Apple

July 1, 2013

It is no secret that MDM is a huge market and Apple is in large part responsible for the trend where non-Microsoft and non-Blackberry devices infiltrated the enterprise. Moreover, corporate IT departments have huge budgets so if Apple came out with an MDM solution it could do exceedingly well in the market.

Writing for TMCnet, Joe Rizzo asks why Apple isn't in this market and he makes some good points.

You have to wonder however the predicament Cupertino is in at the moment.

Clinkle Entering A mobile Wallet Bubble or Bursting Through?

June 27, 2013

Mobile payments are nothing new - it seems everyone is trying to get into the game from PayPal to credit card companies and of course Google. Can any company be far behind the move from messy, dirty physical money to electronic currency?

It seems inevitable that the move will happen - the questions worth asking are, how long with the transition take and exactly how do we hide electronic money under our mattresses after the next financial crisis? I leave the latter question to Silicon Valley entrepreneurs to figure out but it seems Clinkle wants to be the company that helps bring mobile payments really mainstream.

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