Rich Tehrani : Communications and Technology Blog - Tehrani.com
Rich Tehrani
CEO
| Communications and Technology Blog - Latest news in IP communications, telecom, VoIP, call center & CRM space

VoLTE Versus WebRTC: I didn't know it was a battle

When I talk to customers, they often ask about how WebRTC compares to voice over LTE (VoLTE), and which technology “will...

Full Story »

These 3 Do Everything Together

At a few shows, including the latest ITEXPO, the 3 big cablecos - TWC, Comcast and Charter - share a booth....

Full Story »

Modems? In This Day and Age?

Not so many years ago, the only way to connect to the Internet was via a modem. You would use your...

Full Story »

How to Speed Small Cell Site Acquisition on a Large Scale

By: Jean Jones, Director, Wireless Marketing, Alcatel-Lucent

Outdoor small cells are now widely recognized as a great solution for expanding mobile capacity and coverage. And their use is expected to grow sevenfold by 2018.[1] So here’s the next big question: How can you put these cells where they’re needed, faster and at lower cost?

Maybe you’ve already encountered deployment issues, including difficulties with small cell site acquisition. According to an Informa Telecoms & Media survey, nearly 60% of mobile operators say that deployment problems are their biggest small cell challenge.[2] In other words, operators’ top concerns are not about small cell technologies or products. Instead, they’re about the practical aspects of getting these cells up and running on light posts, utility poles, bus stops, buildings and other street locations.

This blog looks at a collaborative approach that makes these deployment processes faster and easier. Alcatel-Lucent adopted these methods for our Metro Cell Express Site Certification Program. And we’re discussing them here, because this business model earned a top award in the small cell innovation leadership category.

Full Story »

HumansFirst ColdSmoke Lets You Buy with your Smartphone

While speech-technology has come a long way, we still haven’t entered the world of Star Trek reruns where the computer can do...

Full Story »

Structural Separation via REIT Equals Zero Taxes

Windstream got the endorsement of the IRS to transfer their assets - copper and fiber plant - to a REIT and...

Full Story »

Connected Cars as an Everyday Lifestyle

By: Ellis Lindsay, General Manager, Customer Experience Solutions, Alcatel-Lucent 

I drive to work and back home in my car every day. I tune in to a radio station for traffic news and upcoming events nearby. Like many of you I’m sure, this is a typical everyday activity. And like never before, we are connected to our home, our families, our phones, our work and our friends in a network that seems to be always on. Shouldn’t we be in a lifestyle where we are consistently connected to the everyday activities in our lives? Well, let me introduce you to the world of Connected Cars. Full Story »

Not So Dumb Terminal

March 30, 2005

The cyclical nature of the computer market is intriguing. When I first got my engineering degree from UCONN, the computer than most of the school was an IBM system 360-370 and we had to program on an OS called MVS and use dumb terminals. My memories are a bit cloudy – similar to how some repress pain or anguish. As I write this article I get that feeling you get when you have that dream – you know the one, where you are running to get to a final but haven’t been to class all semester so you don’t know where it is.

The only thing worse than how you feel when you wake up from such a dream is using an IBM mainframe in batch processing mode.

Grokster vs. RIAA

March 30, 2005

Here is a good story on the ramifications of the Grokster, Kazaa and RIAA case. The issue at hand is if you sue inventors that produce products that can be used for illegal purposes, who will innovate? After all, the Xerox machine and iPOD can be used to break laws as well -- does that mean these products should be outlawed or Steve Jobs should be thrown in jail when an iPOD is used to steal a song?

Here is an excerpt:

"Copyright infringement is the only commercially significant use of file sharing," said Donald B. Verrilli Jr. an attorney for the entertainment industry. Acting Solicitor General Paul D. Clement, representing the government, said Grokster and its brethren were being allowed to "build a business model out of infringement."

Richard G. Taranto, arguing for the file-sharing companies, responded that the technology is used extensively for legal swapping of files and that the firms have no way of knowing when their users use the software illegally.

The entertainment industry wants the Sony precedent to allow for liability when the primary use of the product or service is illegal, or when the provider refuses to take steps to try to stem potential piracy.
But those notions provoked skepticism and sharp questioning from several justices, who wondered how inventors could know whether many people might use their products for illicit purposes.
"How do we know in advance on your test" whether the inventor is safe to go forward?









Juniper Buys Kagoor

March 30, 2005

Juniper just picked up session border controller company Kagoor Networks. In brief talks with company representatives I learned the two companies have similar customers and partners and don’t compete so the synergy was natural. There are many session border controllers on the market and one wonders if this move will lead to more consolidation or bring new competitors into the market.

Will competing with Juniper make it more difficult or less to be in the session border controller space? I hear that virtually all other companies selling SBCs are doing well so the market seems to have lots of life left in it.

WSJ on VoIP

March 30, 2005

There is an interesting VoIP article in the Wall Street Journal today that discusses the increased competition in the market and how the players may be able to find areas where they can specialize in. James Tobin the vp and general manager of advanced voice services at AOL sees VoIP as a reason for customers to move to broadband. This is something Niklas Zennström, Skype CEO and co-founder said to me in a recent interview as well.

The article then mentions that the battle will boil down to the relationships the existing phone companies have with customers today versus the ability of cable companies to bundle their services into integrated packages.

The article ends on the note I mentioned above and that is that VoIP providers will have to learn to differentiate themselves.

"The market is still so new, we'll be able to coexist," Mr. Tobin said. "Time Warner has 500 magazines but you wouldn't say that they're competing with each other; it also has two movie studios but they do different things."



I agree with this article wholeheartedly.





Telecommuting Tax

March 30, 2005

A pretty important case was just decided on in New York according to the Wall Street Journal. The New York Court of Appeals said computer programmer Thomas Huckaby, who lives in Nashville, Tenn., owed New York income tax for his full salary, not just the time he spent working at his employer's New York offices.

Mr. Huckaby, whose home state doesn't have an income tax, paid New York state tax on about 25% of his income over two years for the time he spent working there for the National Organization of Industrial Trade Unions.

Mr. Huckaby's attorney, Peter Faber, said the case is one of the first of its kind involving the income-tax liability of a telecommuter. He said he may appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court because most states base income-tax liability on the residence of the taxpayer.

Marc Violette, spokesman for state Assistant Solicitor General Julie Mereson, said, "New York provides the job, New York provides the professional opportunity, and New York should be able to tax that income, even if the employee for his own convenience was working outside of New York state."

This case has dramatic implications for telecommuters everywhere and could potentially reduce the talent pool that companies in big cities have access to.







Alpha Telecom

March 29, 2005

Alpha-Telecom promises to get your company to VoIP without the forklift. Whether you are on Centrex or a Nortel or Avaya PBX, you can minimize you initial costs. The company’s Arion series of VoIP gateways migrate an enterprise's legacy telephones into the service provider's system, enabling the carrier to offer Centrex features over its IP backbone and to seamlessly provision, configure and manage VoIP service without user intervention; the service provider merely ships the Arion units to the customer for plug-and-play attachment to individual phones by the enterprise's IT department or by the users themselves. Your IT department can also deploy an Alpha Telecom element management system (EMS) for provisioning, mass configuration, troubleshooting and mass upgrades.

Tom Keating on Vonage

March 29, 2005

Tom’s Vonage blog is sure to jog your memory of that catchy Vonage jingle. While you listen you can learn about Vonage’s use of a direct mail newsletter to drive customer affinity and sell more product. If for no other reason than to wake service providers up, I am glad Jeff Citron is at the head of this company. What was the most interesting marketing ILECS have done?

Carol Mattey Joins Deloitte

March 29, 2005

Deloitte & Touche today named Carol Mattey a director in regulatory consulting practice for technology, media & telecommunications industry. This is the second Deloitte blog entry today

Ms. Mattey will provide a comprehensive range of consulting and regulatory compliance services to clients in Deloitte’s TMT practice, helping them to anticipate and address strategic and operational risks in the regulatory arena.

Prior to joining Deloitte & Touche, Ms. Mattey was the deputy chief of the Federal Communications Commission’s Wireline Competition Bureau. She previously served as chief of the FCC’s Policy and Program Planning Division, Common Carrier Bureau. Prior to her 10 years with the FCC, she was with the National Telecommunications and Information Administration within the U.S.



AudioCodes Announcements

March 29, 2005

AudioCodes is announcing lots of new products including the Mediant 1000 VoIP Media Gateway which will fit in enterprise and service provider markets quite nicely. Think of this as the Bud Light (meant respectfully of course) of media gateway as it is cost-effective and compact. Having only seen the product briefly I am not in a position to opine on whether it tastes great or is less filling but it does take less rack space which is a plus in many of today’s enterprises.

The IP-PX companies really like this product because it allows them to add a Pentium CPU blade making an IP-PBX and Gateway combo. Resellers like the product as well because the can plug in a T1 or analog tray.

MCI Chooses Verizon

March 29, 2005

Featured Events