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Benefits of Standardization in the Internet of Things

By: Tim Carey, Industry Standards Manager of Alcatel-Lucent’s Customer Experience Division

The world of M2M is changing as solutions move from single purpose devices that transmit data to and receive commands from an application in the network to an Internet of Things where solutions permit devices to be multi-purpose and applications to be collaborative.

The Internet of Things can benefit from global standardization efforts that:

  • Enable deployment of standards compliant devices and applications with no or minimal customization thereby expanding the applicable device ecosystem and reducing deployment time
  • Provide an ecosystem that readily allow applications to share information and experiences
  • Provide an environment where communication occurs securely and the privacy and confidentiality of the user is maintained

Full Story »

Benefits of Standardization in the Internet of Things

By: Tim Carey, Industry Standards Manager of Alcatel-Lucent’s Customer Experience Division

The world of M2M is changing as solutions move from single purpose devices that transmit data to and receive commands from an application in the network to an Internet of Things where solutions permit devices to be multi-purpose and applications to be collaborative.

The Internet of Things can benefit from global standardization efforts that:

  • Enable deployment of standards compliant devices and applications with no or minimal customization thereby expanding the applicable device ecosystem and reducing deployment time
  • Provide an ecosystem that readily allow applications to share information and experiences
  • Provide an environment where communication occurs securely and the privacy and confidentiality of the user is maintained

Full Story »

Successful Communications Services Have Six Features in Common

By: Mae Kowalke, TMCnet Contributor

Large enterprises increasingly resemble public network service providers as they manage access, transport and network routing while controlling devices and sessions. Whether businesses build their own or buy their communications services through a public provider, the IP communications architectures are looking remarkably similar.

“I’ve noticed that both private service operators (CIOs of large enterprises) and public service providers are implementing very similar solutions around the globe,” wrote Oliver Krahn in a recent TechZine article, 6 Steps that Improve Communications Services.
ALUSnip10.14.2.JPGSource: Alcatel-Lucent

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Most Mobile Traffic Happens In-Building, and Operators Need to Beef Up Their Support

By: Mae Kowalke, TMCnet Contributor

Most mobile traffic is consumed indoors, and operators need to get a better grip on serving this market since it is a huge one.

Roughly 80 percent of mobile traffic is now consumed in-building, according to a recent Gartner study, whether mobile bandwidth is consumed in a public space, a shopping mall, or at the office. The total market for in-building services is estimated to be $4.3 billion currently, according to ABI research, and it is expected to grow to $8.5 billion by 2019.

Business leaders recognize the need, too; 72 percent of businesses are interested in enterprise cells that can boost performance on their premises. An Alcatel-Lucent infographic tells the tale.

Full Story »

Most Mobile Traffic Happens In-Building, and Operators Need to Beef Up Their Support

By: Mae Kowalke, TMCnet Contributor

Most mobile traffic is consumed indoors, and operators need to get a better grip on serving this market since it is a huge one.

Roughly 80 percent of mobile traffic is now consumed in-building, according to a recent Gartner study, whether mobile bandwidth is consumed in a public space, a shopping mall, or at the office. The total market for in-building services is estimated to be $4.3 billion currently, according to ABI research, and it is expected to grow to $8.5 billion by 2019.

Business leaders recognize the need, too; 72 percent of businesses are interested in enterprise cells that can boost performance on their premises. An Alcatel-Lucent infographic tells the tale.

Full Story »

What is TADS all about?

On November 12 and 13 TADS will happen.  TADS bills itself in the following way: “TADSummit (TADS) is focused on building...

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Will George Clooney's Wedding Popularize Burner Phones in Your Company?

This morning, news broke that even more celebrity nude photos of have leaked and that George Clooney handed out burner phones to...

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SBC and Scientific Atlanta

April 1, 2005

Scientific-Atlanta recently announced it has signed an agreement with SBC Communications, Inc. to design, build and activate the IP video super hub offices (SHO), IP video hub offices (VHO) and IP video operations center (VOC) for its Project Lightspeed network. The network will be able to deliver video, voice and data services to 18 million households in the SBC 13-state service area.

It is obviously easier for cable companies to deliver voice than it is for ILECS to deliver TV but using IPTV, it is possible to do many things that can’t be done today such as easily piping TV to all computers in a house. How about being able to watch your favorite programs from any computer, just like using s soft client for VoIP? Just as IP has been a tremendous enabler for telephony, it will do the same for TV.

Vonage Canada LNP

April 1, 2005

HostRocket VoIP

April 1, 2005

M5 on Hosting

March 31, 2005

I recently blogged about the hosting market growing slowly. At least that is what IDC is says in a recent report. I decided to get the perspective of M5 Networks a successful company in the hosting business. I asked Dan Hoffman, the CEO for his take on the article.

Juniper Buys Kagoor

March 31, 2005

You may have heard about the Juniper and Kagoor acquisition (article) already but I have the inside scoop on the whys and hows and the future of Juniper now that Kagoor is part of the company. Juniper touts its mission as assuring and securing all traffic over an IP network and its customers, the large service providers are increasingly seeing the need for voice to be among the more important applications they need on their networks.

This led naturally to Juniper needing a session border controller product in its arsenal to allow them to supply the needs of their customers more effectively. In addition, Juniper’s VP of Marketing, Christine Heckart tells me that there are over 100 shared customers between the companies and Juniper wanted access to the company’s talent pool and development base in Israel.

I brought up the rumors I had heard of Juniper looking at other companies in the space such as Jasomi and Christine shared with me that Juniper generally does an analysis of all companies in a space before acquiring one. In the end they want to purchase best in class technology and Kagoor had the best technology hands down.



Nortel VoIP Contract

March 31, 2005

According to Federal Computer Week, Nortel just won a $20 million dollar contract to supply VoIP equipment to the Defense Information Systems Agency.

The contract, announced March 29, will also allow DISA officials to migrate voice traffic from a network managed by MCI to a private network under total Defense Department control, a DISA spokesperson said. Pentagon officials expect the new switches to save money by allowing DISA to use the Defense Department's Global Information Grid-Bandwidth Expansion network to replace leased services.

Voice over IP "that meets military requirements has a clear, positive future as a result of this acquisition," the DISA spokesperson said.

Nortel officials will upgrade six of their SL 100 switches at Air Force bases nationwide to handle IP traffic, including IP trunking, management of PBX systems and voice-over-IP traffic, said Chuck Saffell, president of the company's federal solutions division.

Handling voice calls as IP traffic via DOD's high-capacity fiber-optic network should reduce DISA's costs, said Warren Suss, president of Suss Consulting. DISA's move toward voice over IP represents "a major technology milestone" for the agency, further cementing voice over IP as the preferred technology for voice traffic in government and industry, Suss said.

That the government is heavily deploying VoIP is no surprise to me. They have been exploring VoIp for quite some time now.









MSN Video Downloads

March 31, 2005

If you are Microsoft and you see what Apple has going on with the iTunes – some estimates say this service will generate billions in the next few years – you too will look for your cash cow. What if Microsoft were to one up Apple and come up with a video download service? But forget the per clip pricing you might expect from Apple… Microsoft has already taken that opportunity away by pricing its service a flat $19.95/year.

The MSN Video Downloads service draws on content from Microsoft partners such as CinemaNow, MSNBC.com, and TiVo, allowing subscribers to watch video on their smart phones, Pocket PCs, and Portable Media Centers reports PC Pro

Since the launch of the Microsoft Windows Mobile-based Portable Media Center last fall, more than 20 new content partners, including CinemaNow Inc., MLB.com, MSNBC.com, MSN Music, MTV Networks Music, Napster Inc., SnapStream Media Inc. and TiVo Inc., have agreed to make video available online specifically formatted for Windows Mobile-based multimedia devices.

The service requires Windows XP and Internet Explorer 5 or higher on the user's PC and Windows Media Player 10 and up. Users simply log onto the MSN download site, using a traditional laptop or desktop computer.





GoDaddy E-Mail

March 30, 2005

I just received this e-mail and thought it worth sharing.

 

Dear Valued Go Daddy Customer,

Today I have the unfortunate responsibility of informing you that there has been a decision made by bureaucrats of a Federal agency that takes away your right to privacy as guaranteed by the United States Constitution.

This decision was unilaterally made by the National Telecommunications and Information Association ("NTIA") www.ntia.doc.gov without hearings that would determine the impact on those affected, and delivered without notice — in short, the NTIA decision was made without due process of any kind. This is exactly how our government is not supposed to work.

The effect of this decision is to disallow new private domain name registrations on .US domain names.





Not So Dumb Terminal

March 30, 2005

The cyclical nature of the computer market is intriguing. When I first got my engineering degree from UCONN, the computer than most of the school was an IBM system 360-370 and we had to program on an OS called MVS and use dumb terminals. My memories are a bit cloudy – similar to how some repress pain or anguish. As I write this article I get that feeling you get when you have that dream – you know the one, where you are running to get to a final but haven’t been to class all semester so you don’t know where it is.

The only thing worse than how you feel when you wake up from such a dream is using an IBM mainframe in batch processing mode.

Grokster vs. RIAA

March 30, 2005

Here is a good story on the ramifications of the Grokster, Kazaa and RIAA case. The issue at hand is if you sue inventors that produce products that can be used for illegal purposes, who will innovate? After all, the Xerox machine and iPOD can be used to break laws as well -- does that mean these products should be outlawed or Steve Jobs should be thrown in jail when an iPOD is used to steal a song?

Here is an excerpt:

"Copyright infringement is the only commercially significant use of file sharing," said Donald B. Verrilli Jr. an attorney for the entertainment industry. Acting Solicitor General Paul D. Clement, representing the government, said Grokster and its brethren were being allowed to "build a business model out of infringement."

Richard G. Taranto, arguing for the file-sharing companies, responded that the technology is used extensively for legal swapping of files and that the firms have no way of knowing when their users use the software illegally.

The entertainment industry wants the Sony precedent to allow for liability when the primary use of the product or service is illegal, or when the provider refuses to take steps to try to stem potential piracy.
But those notions provoked skepticism and sharp questioning from several justices, who wondered how inventors could know whether many people might use their products for illicit purposes.
"How do we know in advance on your test" whether the inventor is safe to go forward?









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