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Rich Tehrani
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Broadband

Is Hotel WiFi About to Start Sucking?

September 4, 2012


I like to see myself as the glass is half-full kind of person but I really try to be realistic so yes, sometimes it is one-half empty. And the two sides are tearing at each other as the news breaks regarding hotel Wifi. You see there is huge news as Accor Hotels which has in its portfolio the Sofitel, Novitel, Ibis and Mercure brands has decided to make all its WiFi at its hotels free.

This is a major hotel chain and global at that – some of the company’s hotels in fact play in markets where the charges are as high as £8.50 (13 dollars) an hour!

No doubt this move will be followed by other chains who will fear losing customers.

Dialogic: The Disruptor Combats Disruption

August 30, 2012

Perhaps nothing has disrupted communications more than Dialogic innovations. This post shows how they are reacting to disruption they initiated

Disruption is not a new concept. We all get that Amazon disrupted Circuit City, the advent of the MP3 reduced sales of CDs and digital photography wreaked havoc on filmmakers like Kodak.

Are Apple's Patent Lawsuits Dead Right?

August 30, 2012

I have often referred to patents between large tech firms as mutually assured destruction as any of these companies can sue others with a slew of patent infringements at once, counting on a few to be upheld by a court. And this is what happened with Apple and Samsung where the Korean phone maker and tech giant was found to have willfully copied Apple’s trade dress meaning the look and feel of the device – among other things like pinching to zoom.

Jason Perlow at ZDnet points us to a good video from Cowan, Liebowitz & Latman, on the topic of patents and trademarks in the food industry. It is boring but useful if you want to learn more.

Google Leverages Home Page to Promote Nexus Tablet

August 28, 2012

Google has been "different" for over a decade because the company always resisted overt advertising seen throughout the web. Through the entire pop-up era where so many websites capitulated and ran ads for security cameras and other items, Google stood almost alone.



But as you can see from the page above - click to enlarge, Google has now decided to use its premium real estate - the home page to run ads. The first ad is for the company's Nexus tablet.

Sure, the company has been making sponsored links look more and more like regular ads over the past few months and years - this trend isn't new for the company. Moreover, we have seen the company promote Chrome and other software products in the past - most of these however have been free products.

For those people who said the company would become "evil" shortly after becoming a public company - you may be right (assuming you consider this sort of behavior to be bad." For those of you who said the Motorola Mobility acquisition was "stupid" well perhaps you are wrong if the company rings up massive sales as a result of perhaps the best marketing strategy on the internet.

Will public backlash be so great that the search leader is forced to change course?









Pensions May Break Companies like They are Breaking Cities

August 21, 2012

We know that bloated and unsustainable pensions have already helped bankrupt industries like airlines and more recently cities in California. But just wait… Our low interest environment is making it difficult if not impossible for pension funds at many public companies to make the returns they need to fund themselves. To resolve the problem, Congress has changed the way pension obligations are calculated and as a result, they can use a 25-year average instead of today’s rates.

CenturyLink recently reported it is able to save a billion dollars due to this federal legislation.

Protecode: Eliminating the Pitfalls of Software Development

August 20, 2012

Software development productivity has evolved tremendously over the decades as the cost of computing has plummeted rapidly while the cost of human capital has accelerated. Of course there are some anomalies in the “human capital” part of the curve as development can now take place in countries like India where wages are lower than say Silicon Valley. Still, when plotted against a dollar per unit of computing power curve which is exponentially decreasing, it continues to be much more expensive to hire programmers than to add processor cores or to increase clock speed.

Case in point, a few decades back when programming an IBM mainframe, it didn’t matter that programmers had to batch their programs using punch cards and wait for the computer’s results because you weren’t going to add more mainframe processing power unless you won corporate Lotto.

Not So Fast - Yes We Should Protect Innovation

August 20, 2012


The tech news of the day includes Google using its Motorola Mobility patents to sue Apple. Patent suits aren’t new but we are getting to a point where the news flow relating to patent litigation seems to be overshadowing the news relating to new products. The cost of these suits isn’t trivial and there is risk of significant distraction for all the companies involved. It seems like the industry would benefit from a tech patent truce.

TMC San Jose Video Interviews 2012

August 15, 2012

A few weeks back, my team and I went to Silicon Valley, CA to interview a number of companies in the technology and communications space. Officially the event is called the TMC Roadshow/Executive Editorial Open House. The goal of the event was to get a handle on what was new and exciting. Here you have a list of most of our interviews - some were video, some written and some haven't been processed yet.

There was a good mix of companies represented from cloud communications to cloud storage, testing, wireless, mobility and even webRTC.

Paul Singh, Chairman of DocSync details his company's innovative cloud syncing service



You'll also notice there is a strong mix of company sizes from some you might not of heard of to the largest of the large.





What the Auto Market can Teach us about Mobile

August 14, 2012

Have you ever heard from someone that they don’t like Starbucks coffee but they like the experience at the store so they go in, sit down and buy the coffee? It is quite a testament to the world’s largest coffee chain that they are able to lure in customers who don’t like their premium-priced primary product but are instead attracted to their comfortable seating areas and atmosphere replete with cushy couches and free WiFi.

The point here is people buy things for subtle reasons they may not consciously realize. But how you may ask does this translate into tech and cars?

Use it and Lose it: No Shared Hotspots At London Olympics

July 30, 2012

Of course having hundreds of thousands of hotspots operating at once and being shared by many users and/or devices could potentially cause a problem for carriers and any organization looking to utilize WiFi over relatively free and clear radio waves. The solution if you are the London Olympics however is straightforward.

First, ban the use of "shared" hotspots by adding them to a list which also includes pepper sprays, fireworks, knives, laser pointers, drugs, firearms and radio scanners.

Next, confiscate offending devices.

Here is the specific wording... Be sure to read it and comply before it's too late:

Personal/private wireless access points and 3G hubs (smart devices such as Android phones, iPhone and tablets are permitted inside venues, but must not be used as wireless access points to connect multiple devices)











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