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Rich Tehrani
CEO
| Communications and Technology Blog - Latest news in IP communications, telecom, VoIP, call center & CRM space

Wireless

iPhone 4S Review with Help from Duran Duran

October 27, 2011

Two days ago I happened upon a new iPhone 4S as a replacement for my current 4 model. On the same day, I had an opportunity to go to Madison Square Garden and watch a Duran Duran concert where I was able to put this state of the art phone through its paces. I found it ironic that Simon Le Bon, the lead singer of the group said he was first in the Garden 30 years ago – and that was around the time I was introduced to PCs and programming in general. Now, here I was using the new phone as a camera in what has to be one of the harshest environments ever in which to shoot photos and videos.

See Digital Photos on iPad Immediately

October 27, 2011


Photojojo, a site I learned about at TMC and Crossfire Media's DevCon5 HTML5 developer conference this past summer has a new iPad card reader supporting CompactFlash and SD allowing you to immediately see photos you shoot with your digital camera. You can have the best of both worlds - no more waiting till you get to a PC to upload and then download to the iPad.

The CF reader is $30, the SD reader is $15 and for $40 you get both.

For about $60 you can further opt for an iPad card reader from Koolertron which handles all major formats such as CF, SD, MMC, MicroSD and M2.

Slowly but surely, the limitations of having an iPad as opposed to a PC or laptop are beginning to fade. If only Adobe Flash support were next.

Disclosure: I am the CEO of TMC








FreeWave Technologies Provides Secure, Long-Range Radio Communications

October 26, 2011

Submarine cable systems between the UK, Canada and Paris became essential in the 1850s as the British government found itself in a situation where it would fight wars, sign treaties and still have thousands of soldiers in the field fighting – totally oblivious to the end of conflict. This cost the UK a tremendous amount of money and reducing this cost became a priority. Once the cables were laid they also became invaluable to the shipping industry as they allowed ships to be rerouted to ports which would be more lucrative destinations.

Nowadays with 3G, 4G and WiFi networks overlapping in much of the developed world we take instant communications for granted but this is not the case.

Occupy Protestors get "Arrested" App. "Irony" App Needed

October 25, 2011

It is difficult to know what the “Occupy” protestors want but it seems they aren’t happy with the way Wall Street works and believe it’s rigged; salaries are too big, etc. But whatever the reason they are there, some of them are now using their tech smarts to build apps which help their cause. For example, a new “I’m Getting Arrested” app lets a protester tell their friends quickly that they are about to go to jail.

Many of the interviews with protestors I’ve heard show strong socialist/Marxist beliefs and I find a dramatic irony between these views and the launching of an app which requires a smartphone.

Blackberry Outage: Lives Saved, Accidents Down

October 20, 2011

Abu Dhabi saw accident rates plummet by 40% with no fatal accidents precisely at the time when Blackberry had its three-day outage in the country. Moreover, in Dubai the accident rate dropped by 20% during the same period (perhaps they have more iPhones and Nokia devices?).

As word spreads, expect even stricter laws to prevent texting while driving. But as studies have shown, such laws tend to increase traffic accidents because it causes drivers not to text less but to hide the phone while they text, meaning their eyes are even farther away from the road.

Will Apple's new Siri on the iPhone 4S be the solution to the texting while driving problem? Perhaps.



Identity Management is the Decade's Killer App and Facebook Knows it

October 17, 2011

How long before we hear the TSA say, "Boarding pass and Facebook ID please?"

Have we gotten to the point where Facebook has become so dominant as an online identity system that is going to enter the real world with business cards which can be read via NFC and RFID. Well according to a new Facebook trademark application the company seems to have huge ambitions in the offline world and one can easily see how a Facebook ID can become even more secure than a government issued identification card.

And for that matter, it is only a matter of time before such a card could be used as a payment system competing with credit card companies and banks.

Identity management is this decade's killer app and Facebook knows it... Once you have information on who a person is and it is authenticated, you open up the world of secure commerce. Couple this with location and you have a powerful security mechanism which could be used to ensure your Facebook charge card can only work when it is in the same location as your phone for example.





Jobs, Ritchie & Galvin Dead but not Forgotten

October 14, 2011

As TMC's Peter Bernstein says, the rule of threes seems to be in effect. First we lost Steve Jobs who transformed the music, movie, computer and mobile markets and next we lost C programming language and UNIX OS creator Dennis Ritchie. The third death was that of Former Motorola CEO Robert Galvin who oversaw the creation of the first "large-screen" (19-inch), transistorized, cordless portable television and the first cell phone among a slew of other important innovations.

As I mentioned yesterday, the C programming language was the fourth one I learned after BASIC, Pascal and PL/1 and what made it unique was its infinite flexibility. All of a sudden a programmer could create dynamic arrays of pointers in a program instead of relying on fixed variables.

Can we Stop Twitter Fail Whale?

October 12, 2011

I must admit I rarely use the Twitter web interface - I am a fan of HootSuite and TweetDeck and use them both depending on various factors. So I don't see the fail whale that often. But today I decided to respond to someone who retweeted one of my tweets by clicking on the link I received via twitter in an email. Sure enough, the fail whale came up - I have seen it so often years ago before I started using Twitter interfaces listed above.



The question I have to ask is - if we as a world are relying on Twitter so much for communications, isn't it important to society to have this thing working correctly all the time?



At Metaswitch Forum 2011

October 3, 2011

I presented at two sessions today at Metaswitch Forum 2011 and both focused on wireline trends in the market. The general theme of this conference so far has to do with how carriers can compete in a world which is rapidly becoming mobile and social. Metaswitch for it's part has been busy improving it's platforms allowing carriers to take back control of business relationships with their customers.

Interesting takeaways from this session is a discussion being led by Anusha 'Ash' Nirmalananthan of Metaswitch where she is dissecting some social network activities in Facebook and Skype and exposing areas of exploitation for carriers.

She says, innovation and differentiation are crucial for carriers going forward.



Selling your Privacy Evolves with Amazon Silk Browser

September 29, 2011



Amazon's new Silk browser bundled with its new Kindle Fire will leverage it's own servers for browser proxying meaning that all the websites you surf will go through the company's cloud-based servers. Although browser proxying is not new, it has been used in the Skyfire and other browsers. Its general benefit is allowing web sessions to speed up and providing mobile browsers access to content incompatible with the browser - such as Adobe Flash.

TMC's Tom Keating has more on the privacy concerns and after reading his thoughts I realize just how fast product subsidization is evolving. You see yesterday I explained Amazon is subsidizing its tablets via Amazon Prime and cloud-computing services but now it seems Amazon will also have access to the sites you browse allowing its suggestion engine to to potentially use this data to better target products which suit your interests.

While privacy advocates may be up in arms, the reality is we sell our privacy for free services virtually every day when we use popular web portals, online email and a slew of other services such as browser toolbars.





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