VoIP the FCC and Freedom of Speech

Rich Tehrani : Communications and Technology Blog - Tehrani.com
Rich Tehrani
CEO
| Communications and Technology Blog - Latest news in IP communications, telecom, VoIP, call center & CRM space

VoIP the FCC and Freedom of Speech

Here is a great article on VoIP the FCC and Freedom of Speech.Excerpt: 
NOVEMBER 29, 2004 (COMPUTERWORLD) - It must be tough being America's nanny, especially when there's so much real work to do. Michael Powell, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, and his feckless colleagues are on a roll these days. They're chasing so-called indecency from the airwaves with a zeal we haven't seen in decades, causing broadcasters to turn what's already a Pablum medium into even worse junk. What does this have to do with the world of business and IT? Plenty -- the serious telecom issues on the FCC's plate need attention, and they're not getting enough of it. There's been at least a tiny bit of progress on one key issue: whether Internet-based telephony, or VoIP, should be regulated, and if so, by whom. The FCC recently said that it alone should have regulatory authority in this arena. That's a good idea. Many states have been eyeing VoIP in a variety of ways, especially as something they might tax. But if anything in today's communications world is an interstate system, it's the Internet. And VoIP is just one more bit of software using the Net. Now, one could make an argument that Internet calls to or from phones served by fixed-line carriers should come under the authority of the state agencies that regulate the regional telephone monopolies. That would create chaos, however, in an industry that's just beginning to be a serious player on the telecom scene. It would create chaos for customers, too. Federal preemption makes sense in this case. If only this nod to common sense was matched by other recent FCC moves. Susan Crawford, a cyberlaw and intellectual property specialist who teaches at Yeshiva University's Cardozo Law School in New York, recently spotted some remarkable language in an FCC legal brief.
  


Featured Events