David Byrd : Byrd's Eye View
David Byrd
Chief Marketing Officer for ANPI

We ask the experts: How can exceptional QoE be achieved in VoLTE networks?

By: Jean Jones, Director, Wireless Marketing, Alcatel-Lucent

What does voice over LTE (VoLTE) offer your subscribers? Better voice quality, including HD voice. Rich communications with messaging and video. And whatever inventive applications you choose to introduce. In other words, VoLTE can provide a superior quality of experience (QoE) for subscribers and give you a competitive edge — particularly when your service operates at its best. 

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In my last blog[CCE1] , our experts explained why an end-to-end strategy is the key to maintaining peak VoLTE performance. Now we’ll look at how this strategy gets put into practice to optimize real-world service offerings. The information here is based on interviews with Luis Venerio who works with our VoLTE Readiness Services team. And his observations come straight from his experience on VoLTE deployments that serve millions of subscribers.

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Wearable Tech Expo 2014 Kicking off in NYC

My team is at the Jacob Javits Center setting up for Wearable Tech Expo 2014 which will take place Wednesday and Thursday...

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When Does WebRTC Need a Media Server? Reason #7

Tsahi Levent-Levi’s white paper, “Seven Reasons for WebRTC Server-Side Processing,” details a variety of WebRTC-related scenarios that necessitate a media server....

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How signaling spikes affect networks: 3 real-world examples

By: Josee Loudiadis, Director of Network Intelligence, Alcatel-Lucent

Data and signaling growth are usually good news for network operators, since growth often translates into higher revenues. But when growth is averaged over a month or quarter, the daily highs and lows of network activity are smoothed out. And signaling spikes remain hidden within the averages. These spikes can overwhelm available signaling capacity, which impairs the customer experience, as well as the operator’s reputation.

What happens when a spike occurs? Typically, a CPU Overload alarm appears on various mobile nodes. And the Network Operations Center (NOC) immediately starts praying that the burst is short-lived and doesn’t go over maximum peak-rate capacity. Because when that happens, all consumers are denied service access. Then, the process of identifying the source of the problem begins. This can be arduous, because it often involves applications completely out of NOC control. And the issue can’t be resolved easily without solid network analytics that enables engagement with application and device developers.

That’s the reason signaling information is a crucial part of the Alcatel-Lucent Mobile Apps Rankings report and why LTE World 2014 devotes an entire pre-conference day to the topic. It’s also why this blog offers a closer look at how some real-world disruptive signaling spikes got started — and were finally resolved.

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The Expanding Channel Programs

Not only do I see more cloud service providers looking to the channel for sales, I see other channel programs expanding....

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When Does WebRTC Need a Media Server? Reason #6

In a recent blog about the current state of WebRTC, I mentioned that readers should check out an excellent white paper...

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The Six Degrees of Mobile Data Plan Innovation: It's Not All About Data- Mobile Voice and Messaging Share Plans Offer Plenty of Appeal

Alcatel-Lucent’s Rich Crowe continues the Six Degrees of Mobile Data Plan Innovation blog series by examining the degree to which consumers are interested in share plans that include unlimited voice and messaging but don’t include data.

The last Six Degrees blog explored consumer attitudes toward two different mobile share plan options: sharing data only and sharing voice, messaging and data. This blog will explore attitudes toward a 3rd option: sharing unlimited voice and messaging — but not data — across multiple devices or subscribers.

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Sell Unified Communications with Clarity

June 3, 2014

Telecommunications has always been an industry filled with mystery and the unknown. For those of us on the inside, everything seems perfectly logical and, for the most part, well thought out. However, consider the following story I heard this week.

Sometime in the last century, a telephone company decided to upgrade its switching technology to deliver new services to its customer base.

Top 5 Hosted Unified Communications Best Practices

May 29, 2014

Hosted Unified Communications is a mission critical application for most businesses. Few can continue to operate effectively if all communications are down. Therefore, it is extremely important that the selected service provider follow certain best practices that ensure the availability of the service. There are many best practices that a hosted service provider should follow, but these are my Top 5:

  1. 1.  

Will Dinosaurs Roam the US again?

May 20, 2014

AT&T’s response to Comcast’s proposed purchase of Time Warner was to acquire DIRECTV. With Sprint positioning itself to acquire T-Mobile, millions of Americans will see significant changes in their providers with little expectation of more competitive pricing or new features. When Divestiture occurred in 1984, the intent was to divide AT&T into different operating entities, where each would have a regional responsibility to service their customer base, while allowing AT&T to pursue the more lucrative long distance business, sales of computers and continue to own and leverage Bell Labs. The result has been that 30 years later, that version of AT&T was gobbled up by one of its spin-offs and, instead of having eight healthy, thriving companies (7 RBOCs and AT&T), we are down to three: AT&T (formerly Southwestern Bell, Ameritech, Pacific Telesis, BellSouth and AT&T), Verizon (Bell Atlantic and GTE) and Century Link (Qwest and too many others to mention). The expectation that the smaller entities would prevail over time was wrong.

"Commercially Reasonable" is Too Subjective to Protect Internet Commerce

May 16, 2014

When Net Neutrality first came into our lexicon, I was on the side of the open Internet where there were no rules. I continued to promote the wild, wild Internet as the only way to preserve open access and innovation. However, once I became an executive with a service provider such as ANPI, I began to recognize the financial burden/risk that could be imposed upon us if we could not recoup the cost of providing Internet service and make a profit. After all, we are in the business of making profits.

Leadership in Wireless with a Changing Landscape is Challenging

May 13, 2014

Without a doubt, wireless communications continues to grow unabated. The fact that there are more cell phone/wireless subscriptions than people in the US (326.4 million versus 318 million) proves just how pervasive mobile communications is today. And as more and more Americans dump their landline phones (39.4%), the race to expand subscriber bases is more important than ever. Therefore, it is both surprising and interesting news that in the first quarter of 2014, T-Mobile US added 1.256 million new phone subscribers, with the two largest providers trailing badly.

Inflight Mobility is a Success

May 12, 2014

Without a doubt most of you have been on a flight where Wi-Fi access is available. Sometime ago I blog about the cost of using these services while flying and expressed my opinion that I thought it to be too high. I no longer hold that opinion. In fact, I dread boarding on a flight where Wi-Fi is not available.

Bandwidth and Broadband are Complementary, But Not the Same

May 6, 2014

 

Too often, I hear people using the terms bandwidth and broadband interchangeably. They are not the referencing the same thing.

Bandwidth has its origins in the analog world, and is related to hertz, or frequency.

Policing the Wild, Wild Internet with the 3rd Version of Net Neutrality

May 1, 2014

The IP community has all agreed that managing access to the Internet needs to be regulated/managed by someone. In the US, we have a general acceptance that the role belongs to the FCC. The issue facing the FCC is determining what rules to apply to the Internet Service Providers (ISPs) that supports their need for controlling their networks and business goals, as well consumers’ demand for continued delivery of desired applications and services. The Application Service Providers (ASP) are somewhat caught in the middle, and it is unclear if the current suggested FCC rules will ferment continued growth of the ASPs.

SMBs Unified Communications Interest is Changing

April 29, 2014

Several years ago I developed a list of the features and benefits that identified the priority SMBs and Enterprises use to assess Unified Communications (UC). For the most part, I believe that the priorities have held up well but two items have certainly been added to the priority list for SMBs. Here is the original list:


SMBs

  • Business Operations Improvement

v   Conferencing

v   Instant messaging

v   Integrated communications for mobile employees


It's Kairos Time

April 22, 2014

Most of us understand time in terms such as past, present and future. We measure time in increments, with the most common forms ranging from seconds to years. This definition of time is described using the Greek word “Cronus.” However, a lesser-known term for time is more appropriate when endorsing the drive towards developing new IP-based applications, VoIP and Hosted Unified Communications –   “Kairos” time.

Kairos is the Greek word that means the right time or opportune moment.

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