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Brendan Read
TMC
| Contact Center/CRM Views and Analysis

NFV Vendor Challenges Part 2

How will the software in NFV networks interact? Via a Management and Orchestration (MANO) layer.

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Rapport Open APIs Increase Employee Productivity

By: Richard Hatheway, Director, Enterprise Communications Product Marketing, Rapport for Large Enterprise, Alcatel-Lucent

What is one of the biggest factors affecting employee productivity today? Recent studiesby the National Business Research Institute and the Pew Research Center indicate that not having the right technology tools to do their jobs is one of the most critical. From something as simple as having a cell phone to as advanced as having a customized app, having the right tool provides employees with a productivity boost.

Unfortunately though, many large enterprises are unable to take advantage of advances in technology due to old or outdated infrastructure and ICT technology silos. In addition, being locked in to one technology vendor often stymies the enterprise from being able to update the tools necessary to increase employee productivity.

For instance, something as simple as developing and deploying a new app is often a frustrating experience, as the enterprise must submit a request to the technology vendor for a new app to be developed, then wait until the vendor adds it to their development queue before finding out when to expect it. This often takes months, if not longer.

In the meantime, instead of waiting for the new app, many employees take the “shadow IT” route. They download rogue (i.e., non-IT-supported) apps that will allow them to move forward with at least some of the functionality they seek, even without IT support. While this work-around may provide some degree of productivity enhancement for the employee, wouldn’t it be better if the enterprise was able to either plug in existing best-of-breed third-party apps or develop and deploy its own apps without having to wait for a vendor to become involved?

Alcatel-Lucent thinks so, which is one of the reasons our new solution, Rapport™ for Large Enterprise, is generating so much interest. Rapport is a private cloud-based communications and collaboration solution designed specifically for the large enterprise.

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Versay Solutions Moves to Support the Omnichannel World

A company known for professional services in the contact center – Chicago-based Versay Solutions has more recently applied its skills in analytics...

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Splice Software Uses the Power of Analytics to Expand its Product Line

Big data and analytics have had a huge impact on numerous spaces and certainly marketing is one of these areas. Perhaps the...

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Jet.com The .Good the .Bad and the .Ugly

The .GoodI’ve been using Jet.com for a few weeks and so far I have found the selection to be about 20-30% of...

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VoicePIN Voice Biometrics Brings New Tech to Phone and Apps

The biometrics market has been around for decades but never achieved widespread acceptance until after Apple rolled out TouchID. Laptop makers...

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Lasers are the Future of Drone Fighting

I’ve been among the first people to realize how drones can be a major problem for security in the world. In February...

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Webinar today

September 13, 2006

VoIP Satisfaction

September 12, 2006

TMCnet's Susan Campbell wrote an article today called, "Study: Customer Satisfaction with VoIP Higher than Traditional and Mobile Services" about a survey conducted by Level 3 Communications. The article states that, "In fact, the study reveals that 86 percent of VoIP customers are very satisfied with their service, compared to 74 percent satisfaction among traditional landline customers and 66 percent satisfaction among wireless customers."

I can happily report that I am one of those people who are happier with their VoIP service than other telecom services. But I've got an easy reason:

More Dell Woes

September 11, 2006

How many misfortunes of its own making can a company reasonably sort through per quarter? We'll soon find out, since Dell is in the news again today in a negative light. The business news this Monday is highlighting new troubles the PC company is having with the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC). Dell is putting off releasing its second quarter reports after the SEC has raised questions about, among other things, Dell's accruals, reserves and other balance sheet items.

Who's Who In Teleservices

September 5, 2006

Who's Who In Teleservices

 

 

Once again, the editors of Customer Inter@ction Solutions will compile what is one of our top five most popular and requested resources: the annual Teleservices Agencies Who’s Who listing. To continue to make this a highly valuable tool, we would like to include as many global outsourced contact center services providers as possible.

 

Cool Laptops

August 30, 2006

Tomorrow's Webinar

August 29, 2006

A Patent For E-Learning?

August 28, 2006

Goodbye, Pluto

August 24, 2006

One wonders if the demotion of Pluto as a true planet, putting us back to eight planets in the solar system for the first time since 1930, will screw up the mnemonics generations of schoolchildren have learned over the years to help them recall the order of the planets. Some of the most popular (according to Wikipedia):

My Very Educated Mother Just Served Us Nine Pizzas could become, "My Very Educated Mother Just Served Us Noodles."

or

iTunes Holdouts

August 21, 2006

If you're fans of the artists involved and you have an iPod, you already know who they are: the Beatles, Radiohead, Led Zeppelin and many others.

They are holdouts who refuse to allow their music onto Apple's wildly popular iTunes Web site for fan downloads at .99 cents per song. While I agree with many who say they cannot hold out forever if they don't want to be left behind by the reality that is digital music delivery today, I can sympathize with their reasons.

Pop music has always been taken one sip at a time (that's all most people over 18 can frankly tolerate, I think).

$2 Million Grammar Error

August 7, 2006

For those people who scoff at correct grammar, puncuation and language usage in business, here's an interesting piece from today's Toronto Globe & Mail. IT seems Rogers Communications Inc. will be forced to pay $2.13 million Canadian dollars more than planned for a deal with Aliant Inc. because of a misplaced comma in the contract between the two companies.

The error occurred in this sentence: "The agreement shall continue in force for a period of five years from the date it is made, and thereafter for successive five year terms, unless and until terminated by one year prior notice in writing by either party.”

It's the second comma that's the problem. The comma separates "and thereafter for successive five year terms" from the last part of the sentence, "unless and until terminated by one year prior notice in writing." If you take out this dependent clause, the agreement reads, "The agreement shall continue in force for a period of five years from the date it is made unless and until terminated by one year prior notice in writing." Aliant terminated it with one year's prior notice in writing.

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