Brendan Read : The Readerboard
Brendan Read
TMC
| Contact Center/CRM Views and Analysis

Mobile fax? Why do you need that?

Fax is an enduring technology. While you may think that fax is declining, some reports show that the market is actually...

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We ask the experts: How can exceptional QoE be achieved in VoLTE networks?

By: Jean Jones, Director, Wireless Marketing, Alcatel-Lucent

What does voice over LTE (VoLTE) offer your subscribers? Better voice quality, including HD voice. Rich communications with messaging and video. And whatever inventive applications you choose to introduce. In other words, VoLTE can provide a superior quality of experience (QoE) for subscribers and give you a competitive edge — particularly when your service operates at its best. 

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In my last blog[CCE1] , our experts explained why an end-to-end strategy is the key to maintaining peak VoLTE performance. Now we’ll look at how this strategy gets put into practice to optimize real-world service offerings. The information here is based on interviews with Luis Venerio who works with our VoLTE Readiness Services team. And his observations come straight from his experience on VoLTE deployments that serve millions of subscribers.

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Wearable Tech Expo 2014 Kicking off in NYC

My team is at the Jacob Javits Center setting up for Wearable Tech Expo 2014 which will take place Wednesday and Thursday...

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When Does WebRTC Need a Media Server? Reason #7

Tsahi Levent-Levi’s white paper, “Seven Reasons for WebRTC Server-Side Processing,” details a variety of WebRTC-related scenarios that necessitate a media server....

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How signaling spikes affect networks: 3 real-world examples

By: Josee Loudiadis, Director of Network Intelligence, Alcatel-Lucent

Data and signaling growth are usually good news for network operators, since growth often translates into higher revenues. But when growth is averaged over a month or quarter, the daily highs and lows of network activity are smoothed out. And signaling spikes remain hidden within the averages. These spikes can overwhelm available signaling capacity, which impairs the customer experience, as well as the operator’s reputation.

What happens when a spike occurs? Typically, a CPU Overload alarm appears on various mobile nodes. And the Network Operations Center (NOC) immediately starts praying that the burst is short-lived and doesn’t go over maximum peak-rate capacity. Because when that happens, all consumers are denied service access. Then, the process of identifying the source of the problem begins. This can be arduous, because it often involves applications completely out of NOC control. And the issue can’t be resolved easily without solid network analytics that enables engagement with application and device developers.

That’s the reason signaling information is a crucial part of the Alcatel-Lucent Mobile Apps Rankings report and why LTE World 2014 devotes an entire pre-conference day to the topic. It’s also why this blog offers a closer look at how some real-world disruptive signaling spikes got started — and were finally resolved.

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The Expanding Channel Programs

Not only do I see more cloud service providers looking to the channel for sales, I see other channel programs expanding....

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When Does WebRTC Need a Media Server? Reason #6

In a recent blog about the current state of WebRTC, I mentioned that readers should check out an excellent white paper...

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Webinar today

September 13, 2006

VoIP Satisfaction

September 12, 2006

TMCnet's Susan Campbell wrote an article today called, "Study: Customer Satisfaction with VoIP Higher than Traditional and Mobile Services" about a survey conducted by Level 3 Communications. The article states that, "In fact, the study reveals that 86 percent of VoIP customers are very satisfied with their service, compared to 74 percent satisfaction among traditional landline customers and 66 percent satisfaction among wireless customers."

I can happily report that I am one of those people who are happier with their VoIP service than other telecom services. But I've got an easy reason:

More Dell Woes

September 11, 2006

How many misfortunes of its own making can a company reasonably sort through per quarter? We'll soon find out, since Dell is in the news again today in a negative light. The business news this Monday is highlighting new troubles the PC company is having with the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC). Dell is putting off releasing its second quarter reports after the SEC has raised questions about, among other things, Dell's accruals, reserves and other balance sheet items.

Who's Who In Teleservices

September 5, 2006

Who's Who In Teleservices

 

 

Once again, the editors of Customer Inter@ction Solutions will compile what is one of our top five most popular and requested resources: the annual Teleservices Agencies Who’s Who listing. To continue to make this a highly valuable tool, we would like to include as many global outsourced contact center services providers as possible.

 

Cool Laptops

August 30, 2006

Tomorrow's Webinar

August 29, 2006

A Patent For E-Learning?

August 28, 2006

Goodbye, Pluto

August 24, 2006

One wonders if the demotion of Pluto as a true planet, putting us back to eight planets in the solar system for the first time since 1930, will screw up the mnemonics generations of schoolchildren have learned over the years to help them recall the order of the planets. Some of the most popular (according to Wikipedia):

My Very Educated Mother Just Served Us Nine Pizzas could become, "My Very Educated Mother Just Served Us Noodles."

or

iTunes Holdouts

August 21, 2006

If you're fans of the artists involved and you have an iPod, you already know who they are: the Beatles, Radiohead, Led Zeppelin and many others.

They are holdouts who refuse to allow their music onto Apple's wildly popular iTunes Web site for fan downloads at .99 cents per song. While I agree with many who say they cannot hold out forever if they don't want to be left behind by the reality that is digital music delivery today, I can sympathize with their reasons.

Pop music has always been taken one sip at a time (that's all most people over 18 can frankly tolerate, I think).

$2 Million Grammar Error

August 7, 2006

For those people who scoff at correct grammar, puncuation and language usage in business, here's an interesting piece from today's Toronto Globe & Mail. IT seems Rogers Communications Inc. will be forced to pay $2.13 million Canadian dollars more than planned for a deal with Aliant Inc. because of a misplaced comma in the contract between the two companies.

The error occurred in this sentence: "The agreement shall continue in force for a period of five years from the date it is made, and thereafter for successive five year terms, unless and until terminated by one year prior notice in writing by either party.”

It's the second comma that's the problem. The comma separates "and thereafter for successive five year terms" from the last part of the sentence, "unless and until terminated by one year prior notice in writing." If you take out this dependent clause, the agreement reads, "The agreement shall continue in force for a period of five years from the date it is made unless and until terminated by one year prior notice in writing." Aliant terminated it with one year's prior notice in writing.

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