Jim Machi : Industry Insight
Jim Machi

October 2010

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WiFi Offload from 3G

October 27, 2010

In the past couple of weeks, I've had a couple of experiences with using the WiFi feature of my Blackberry. Last week, I wrote about attending Interop in New York and when I attended the keynotes, which were deep within the recesses of the Javitz Convention center, my cell phone dropped to EDGE. So during one of the keynotes (that I didn't find particularly interesting), I started playing around with my Blackberry to get the WiFi going.  Whoa! It was awesome. I got onto the internet and I was flying. Definitely faster than 3G from my perspective. My email also worked great. Definitely a good experience and I will likely use WiFi more often now with my Blackberry when I'm in areas where I can get it.   On a sour note, I also tried WiFi at the new Giants Stadium during the Lions game on October 17. I know officially it's called "New Meadowlands Stadium" but I still call it Giants Stadium. I had read articles about this stadium being the most technologically advanced and having a stadium-wide public WiFi. Well, I found WiFi when I checked. But all the networks I found needed access codes, which doesn't make too much sense to me. I don't know what they're thinking with that.

Clouds and Pall on a Sunny Day at Interop New York

October 20, 2010

When I went into the Javitz Center this morning to attend Interop, it was a bright sunny day. But soon clouds started rolling in. One type of cloud was the pall that comes from bad baseball. Yes, the Yankees have been under the specter of one big, bad, dark, forboding, cumulonimbus cloud right now. Yes, they've been playing like the Mets so now they know what that feels like. It doesn't feel good and it's coming at a bad time considering it's the baseball playoffs. Still a glimmer of hope though.   But another type of cloud comes from Cloud Computing and that was a major theme of Interop. Interop, to me, has roots in the old Network+Interop shows that I used to attend when I worked for Novell. At that time, it was all about networking of course, and the ability to hook up printers to networks!    Now, this is the Business Technology show so enterprise issues such as cloud computing, network and wifi security, storage and telepresence were themes at this show. UC is also here, but from this show's perspective, it's mature and so doesn't quite get the messaging here.   If you are in IT and need to get schooled on the latest goings-on in your area, this is the place to go!

Video on the Bosphorus

October 13, 2010

A few weeks ago, I was in Istanbul with some customers and prospects. As I've written many times in this blog, the promise of adding video to an already existing voice and/or text mobile application is compelling to use, and compelling as a value-added service to offer.  So it's a win-win given the right business model.    Given the 3G networks available in Turkey, I figured it would be a snap to actually demo a mobile video app to these customers and prospects so I called into a customer IVVR demo that shows your airplane seat visually and how to change it from your phone. But alas, there was the error message "no video service, video call failed." Huh?   Well, I just so happened to be with the service provider that my phone was using at the time and they made a few phone calls. It was indeed not offered yet since they haven't figured out the payment plan. Would it be part of the monthly fee? Would it be charged per use? Would you have to buy video prepaid cards to use the service? Since I was roaming, how would the roaming charges work?    These issues will all be worked out, but it was an important reminder to me about why video telephony, like most new technologies, takes a little longer to become ubiquitous than some might think. It's the same to me as VoIP was 10 years ago, and that's why I'm bullish on mobile video.

IT Expo West Action

October 6, 2010

As I write this, I'm at IT Expo West in Los Angeles. The convention center is located right next to the Staples Center (where the Lakers play basketball) and there is much action right around this site. And action inside the convention center with IT Expo going on as well.   This is a memorable site for me since in the late 90's I would come here with 200 other Dialogic colleagues for CT Expo and descend upon the place in a swarm of blue shirts. This is an excellent venue for a conference.   I sat in the beginning of day two of the SIP Trunking and UC Summit day sponsored by InGate. I wasn't able to spend all day in here due to other commitments, but the day looked interesting given the discussion to be had on UC in the service provider market, hosted UC, Enterprise UC and even going over a case study. I also spent some time in the 4GWE part of this conference, heard Avaya speak at lunch about innovation, and also spent time in the Mobile Communication track piece of the conference I spoke it.  This all just confirmed my belief that this is a good conference to attend. 

Dialogic's Deals - Veraz Merger is Complete and the Magic of Early October

October 4, 2010

Yes, it's early October and that means the magic of baseball playoffs in New York. Unfortunately, increasingly, and much to my disappointment, this has nothing to do with the New York Mets. But it's still exciting at this time of year since early October at Dialogic has typically been deal time, meaning, we've either announced or completed a deal - in 2006 (Dialogic assets from Intel), 2007 (Cantata), 2008 (NMS), and now 2010 (Veraz merger). On Friday, we announced the completion of our merger with Veraz Networks. The combined company will be known as Dialogic and is now listed on the NASDAQ under the ticker DLGC.

Since the agreement to merge was announced in May, I've been asked multiple times why we did this deal. People typically commented to me that they figured we'd do a deal, but didn't see a deal with Veraz coming. OK, that's fair enough, but let me explain why.

First of all, we like California and need to go there more and given Veraz is in California; it made sense! In all seriousness though, this does fit into the Dialogic strategy of expanding more into the service provider market. The combined Dialogic now has a very comprehensive portfolio of both multimedia processing infrastructure (which includes media server platforms, VoIP gateways, video gateways, and session border controllers) and call control infrastructure (softswitch and signaling). Dialogic has also touted for quite a few years the importance of security and session border controllers because of the emergence of border elements in general (i.e. IP to IP, including elements of media and signaling and security), and given Veraz has an SBC product, this now means Dialogic is squarely in this space.

And the Veraz portfolio is excellent. In fact, in June, Gartner published a Magic Quadrant for Softswitch Architecture and Veraz moved to the challenger quadrant "because of its focus on its core competency, as well as good execution in emerging markets and with alternative carriers." And the Veraz bandwidth optimized gateways give Dialogic an improved presence in the emerging optimization space.

From a technology perspective, we are clearly unique and differentiated in that we now have media processing, signaling, switching and security technologies and products. I honestly feel that no one else in the market has this breadth of technologies and products. It will be up to us to leverage all these assets appropriately, such as with building improved integrated border elements and marrying video and optimization technologies, but I am confident we will do so as we will be able to focus a larger engineering organization on this. So in a nutshell, the product sets all fit into our strategy.

  This means our customers will benefit because they can now focus on their development and deployment competencies by leaving the complexities of network call control and media processing to us. Our customer base and prospect base can build out their networks, or build their value-added service solutions on Dialogic. 

  It's important to remember that even though this deal is about improving the service provider footprint for Dialogic, the enterprise segment is still forecasted to comprise about 40% of the overall revenue for the combined company, and we will remain focused on the enterprise customer base. We plan to continue with support of Project DiaStarâ„¢ and associated telephony open source initiatives as well. At a higher level, the enterprise customer base will stand to benefit from this deal given that more and more enterprise applications are moving to the cloud, and there is potential synergy among the service provider relationships with Veraz. 

  It's up to us now to successfully integrate into a single Dialogic. We've done that successfully with each of our previous deals, and I'm confident we'll be able to do it again here and that the combined Dialogic will continue to serve your needs if you are a current customer, or will if you have not already worked with us.

  And from our legal department, since this blog is somewhat forward looking, I have the following important message: This material is covered by the Dialogic Legal Notice and the Safe Harbor provisions set forth therein.















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