Jim Machi : Industry Insight
Jim Machi

Access is Still Pretty Good

At all the shows, it is cloud this and cloud that - a bunch of doom and gloom on legacy telecom....

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Mobile fax? Why do you need that?

Fax is an enduring technology. While you may think that fax is declining, some reports show that the market is actually...

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We ask the experts: How can exceptional QoE be achieved in VoLTE networks?

By: Jean Jones, Director, Wireless Marketing, Alcatel-Lucent

What does voice over LTE (VoLTE) offer your subscribers? Better voice quality, including HD voice. Rich communications with messaging and video. And whatever inventive applications you choose to introduce. In other words, VoLTE can provide a superior quality of experience (QoE) for subscribers and give you a competitive edge — particularly when your service operates at its best. 

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In my last blog[CCE1] , our experts explained why an end-to-end strategy is the key to maintaining peak VoLTE performance. Now we’ll look at how this strategy gets put into practice to optimize real-world service offerings. The information here is based on interviews with Luis Venerio who works with our VoLTE Readiness Services team. And his observations come straight from his experience on VoLTE deployments that serve millions of subscribers.

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Wearable Tech Expo 2014 Kicking off in NYC

My team is at the Jacob Javits Center setting up for Wearable Tech Expo 2014 which will take place Wednesday and Thursday...

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When Does WebRTC Need a Media Server? Reason #7

Tsahi Levent-Levi’s white paper, “Seven Reasons for WebRTC Server-Side Processing,” details a variety of WebRTC-related scenarios that necessitate a media server....

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How signaling spikes affect networks: 3 real-world examples

By: Josee Loudiadis, Director of Network Intelligence, Alcatel-Lucent

Data and signaling growth are usually good news for network operators, since growth often translates into higher revenues. But when growth is averaged over a month or quarter, the daily highs and lows of network activity are smoothed out. And signaling spikes remain hidden within the averages. These spikes can overwhelm available signaling capacity, which impairs the customer experience, as well as the operator’s reputation.

What happens when a spike occurs? Typically, a CPU Overload alarm appears on various mobile nodes. And the Network Operations Center (NOC) immediately starts praying that the burst is short-lived and doesn’t go over maximum peak-rate capacity. Because when that happens, all consumers are denied service access. Then, the process of identifying the source of the problem begins. This can be arduous, because it often involves applications completely out of NOC control. And the issue can’t be resolved easily without solid network analytics that enables engagement with application and device developers.

That’s the reason signaling information is a crucial part of the Alcatel-Lucent Mobile Apps Rankings report and why LTE World 2014 devotes an entire pre-conference day to the topic. It’s also why this blog offers a closer look at how some real-world disruptive signaling spikes got started — and were finally resolved.

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The Expanding Channel Programs

Not only do I see more cloud service providers looking to the channel for sales, I see other channel programs expanding....

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Skype + Microsoft = Good for Microsoft

July 5, 2011

The Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference is next week in Los Angeles.   I’m sure there will be extreme interest in the Skype deal and whether Microsoft will have something more to say about it, especially given the recent announcement that the FTC has approved it

I see people writing that the main deal driver is to improve Microsoft’s position in the mobile arena, given Skype can work on iPhones and iPads (I’ve seen people in airports holding an iPad to their ears because of Skype!) and Android devices. 

Mobile Backhaul and Revenue Prediction Curves

June 23, 2011

How come seemingly every revenue prediction curve I see has one of two forms – the “scary” curve which I show above, or the “hockey stick” curve which is the opposite of this?  There are options in-between, which in fact are probably more realistic, but people like to show extremes to make a point.  I write this because earlier this week, I attended Light Reading’s Backhaul and Core Strategies for Mobile Operators Conference in New York.  Telllabs put a chart like this up when talking about the mobile operators’ “profit crisis,” meaning that revenue/bit is declining faster than cost/bit. 

Mobile Money is Not a Port-o-ATM

June 20, 2011

In doing research for this blog, the first search that comes up when typing in “Mobile Money” is for a company that provides mobile ATM machines.  Well, let me be the first to tell you that port-o-ATMs are not the entirety of what mobile money is all about.

I have long been intrigued by the prospect of using your phone to pay for services – simply swipe your phone at something that’s near (or part of) the cash register and your phone acts like a credit card. 

Differences in Mobile Value-Added Services Around the World

June 14, 2011

Since I travel around the world quite a bit, I am frequently asked what the differences are in mobile value-added services in the different regions. First of all, there are many, many services and every time I go someplace, I find out about a new one.  Sometimes I write about them in this blog.

The Significance of the FCC Data Roaming Ruling

June 7, 2011

On April 7th, the FCC ruled that facilities-based providers of commercial mobile data networks need to offer data roaming arrangements to other commercial providers of mobile data networks on reasonable terms.  In other words, AT&T and Verizon need to offer data roaming connectivity to the other mobile data network providers, which would include the likes of MetroPCS, Leap Wireless, etc.  As you might expect, the Rural Cellular Association (RCA) gave this ruling a big thumbs up, because now they can strike deals with AT&T and Verizon to allow data roaming.  Marketing “data roaming” would theoretically draw more subscribers to them.

ITW and an iPad App

May 31, 2011

Last week, I attended the International Telecoms Week (ITW) in Washington, DC.  It’s a very interesting and unique show for the global wholesale telecommunications community to essentially trade minutes.  They do this at what they call “bilateral tables,” which are, well, tables where one party sits on one side and the other party sits on the other side.  And there are rows and rows of these bilateral tables throughout the venue.

Open Source + JAIN SLEE: Mobicents Makes Sense

May 24, 2011

Service Logic Execution Environments (SLEE) play an important role in the telecommunications network, especially when creating applications that marry the web and mobile experience.

Now, you don’t have to use SLEE and you don’t have to use Open Source to create applications that marry the web and mobile experience, but if you are apt to use Open Source as your development philosophy and are interested in an Open Source platform, then Mobicents is the way to go, since it’s the world’s only Open Source JAIN SLEE platform.  Mobicents was acquired by RedHat in 2007, and is part of the JBOSS Communications Platform, also part of RedHat, so they have a great track record in the Open Source telecoms world. 

The African Telecommunications Opportunity

May 17, 2011

I was in Accra, Ghana last week for a customer and prospect event.  Africa is on the cusp of incredible internet and mobile growth.  Submarine cables are coming in, which means more bandwidth.  And fiber is coming in to interconnect the continent, which means more bandwidth. 

Parallels Between the Music Industry and the Telecom Industry

May 10, 2011

When I was in Singapore in April for the Telecom Asia Awards and Conference 2011, one of the most interesting talks was given by Sandy Monteiro of Universal Music.   Here is a link to an interview he did with TelecomAsia back in January which is also interesting. 

His talk was mainly about the revenue/ARPU parallels between the music industry and the telecom industry.  Revenue in the music industry has fallen from all time highs from over 10 years ago to half of that revenue today, due mainly to digitized music.

From Opportunity to Reality!

May 5, 2011

If you read my last three blogs, then you know that there are a number of ways that mobile networks can be monetized, and this provides a tremendous opportunity for service providers.  However, we must all play a role in the monetization of these networks and the entire ecosystem in order for them to fully reach their potential.

How can Dialogic help, you ask?

As I’ve mentioned, mobile networks are delivering entertainment and information to an ever-widening world eager to connect quickly and seamlessly. Dialogic focuses on the promise of this technology and today, networks using Dialogic technology carry more than fifteen billion minutes of traffic per month, and services built on Dialogic products are used by an estimated two billion mobile subscribers worldwide! 



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