Jim Machi : Industry Insight
Jim Machi

What's With the MSO Consolidation?

Charter was the first company to make a play for TWC. Now reports are in that Charter is chasing Bright House....

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Expect Security Funding Bubble to Pop in 3-5 Years

Security is one of the hottest areas in tech right now. Indeed, there is infinite possibility in this space because technology...

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SmartPhoneMan and His Interaction with Media Servers on St. Patrick's Day

Last week we made it about halfway through SmartPhoneMan’s day.  Let’s finish his day.  Right now, he’s in a rush to...

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Verizon Invites the Channel Once More

Jon Arnold wrote up a good review of Verizon's Broad Cloud offering (VCE). One glaring problem is that it targets in...

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Media Servers and St. Patrick's Day

Last week I wrote about the important role media servers play in the network.  Today is St. Patrick’s Day and let’s...

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What Can You Learn from Target?

I was reading a couple of articles about Target. The retailer has not been doing well lately, including closing all Canada...

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Media Servers Will Play an Increasingly Important Role for Telco Apps

Media servers play an important role in enabling many of the real-time communications applications many of us use every day.  When...

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Outbound Notification in the IP World

August 2, 2011

We’ve all had experience with some kind of outbound notification system – maybe a machine calling to inform you that your childen’s school has been closed due to a snowstorm, or some IT triggered alert about your website, or a very sincere recorded voice calling you right at dinnertime during election season.  Generally, there are two types of outbound notification systems – the commercial ones such as above, or an emergency notification, which includes crisis alerts.  The crisis alerts form a part of the Public Safety segment, which I recently wrote a blog about.

The Changing Face of Emergency Calling

July 26, 2011

The FCC estimates that 70% of 911 calls are placed by wireless callers.  Couple that with the increase in VoIP phone services, and you can quickly see that the majority of 911 calls are no longer coming from wired lines that are associated with specific addresses.  Additionally, with the increased capability of wireless networks, whether 3G or 4G, and with the capability of VoIP networks, one can also see that data, images, and video can also potentially be transmitted in a 911 “call” to a PSAP (Public Safety Answering Point). 

The Internet and FoIP and Fax in the Clouds

July 19, 2011




Faxing is alive and well these days.  The movement of Fax over IP similar to the movement of Voice over IP is occurring.  Fax over IP (FoIP) is a growing trend, expecting to be a $415M business in 2014, according to Davidson Consulting

It may be amazing to some readers that faxing still occurs. 




HD Calling

July 12, 2011

Nope, neither the Home Depot nor Harley Davidson is calling you.  But it is increasingly likely someone will be calling you using High Definition (HD) Voice.  For you Clash fans, possibly even London may be calling since HD Voice is now available in the UK.   In fact, according to a June report from the GSA, HD Voice is now available on 20 mobile networks in 18 countries. 

Skype + Microsoft = Good for Microsoft

July 5, 2011

The Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference is next week in Los Angeles.   I’m sure there will be extreme interest in the Skype deal and whether Microsoft will have something more to say about it, especially given the recent announcement that the FTC has approved it

I see people writing that the main deal driver is to improve Microsoft’s position in the mobile arena, given Skype can work on iPhones and iPads (I’ve seen people in airports holding an iPad to their ears because of Skype!) and Android devices. 

Mobile Backhaul and Revenue Prediction Curves

June 23, 2011

How come seemingly every revenue prediction curve I see has one of two forms – the “scary” curve which I show above, or the “hockey stick” curve which is the opposite of this?  There are options in-between, which in fact are probably more realistic, but people like to show extremes to make a point.  I write this because earlier this week, I attended Light Reading’s Backhaul and Core Strategies for Mobile Operators Conference in New York.  Telllabs put a chart like this up when talking about the mobile operators’ “profit crisis,” meaning that revenue/bit is declining faster than cost/bit. 

Mobile Money is Not a Port-o-ATM

June 20, 2011

In doing research for this blog, the first search that comes up when typing in “Mobile Money” is for a company that provides mobile ATM machines.  Well, let me be the first to tell you that port-o-ATMs are not the entirety of what mobile money is all about.

I have long been intrigued by the prospect of using your phone to pay for services – simply swipe your phone at something that’s near (or part of) the cash register and your phone acts like a credit card. 

Differences in Mobile Value-Added Services Around the World

June 14, 2011

Since I travel around the world quite a bit, I am frequently asked what the differences are in mobile value-added services in the different regions. First of all, there are many, many services and every time I go someplace, I find out about a new one.  Sometimes I write about them in this blog.

The Significance of the FCC Data Roaming Ruling

June 7, 2011

On April 7th, the FCC ruled that facilities-based providers of commercial mobile data networks need to offer data roaming arrangements to other commercial providers of mobile data networks on reasonable terms.  In other words, AT&T and Verizon need to offer data roaming connectivity to the other mobile data network providers, which would include the likes of MetroPCS, Leap Wireless, etc.  As you might expect, the Rural Cellular Association (RCA) gave this ruling a big thumbs up, because now they can strike deals with AT&T and Verizon to allow data roaming.  Marketing “data roaming” would theoretically draw more subscribers to them.

ITW and an iPad App

May 31, 2011

Last week, I attended the International Telecoms Week (ITW) in Washington, DC.  It’s a very interesting and unique show for the global wholesale telecommunications community to essentially trade minutes.  They do this at what they call “bilateral tables,” which are, well, tables where one party sits on one side and the other party sits on the other side.  And there are rows and rows of these bilateral tables throughout the venue.

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