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| Peter Radizeski of RAD-INFO, Inc. talking telecom, Cloud, VoIP, CLEC, and The Channel.

Wearable Tech Expo 2014 Kicking off in NYC

My team is at the Jacob Javits Center setting up for Wearable Tech Expo 2014 which will take place Wednesday and Thursday...

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When Does WebRTC Need a Media Server? Reason #7

Tsahi Levent-Levi’s white paper, “Seven Reasons for WebRTC Server-Side Processing,” details a variety of WebRTC-related scenarios that necessitate a media server....

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How signaling spikes affect networks: 3 real-world examples

By: Josee Loudiadis, Director of Network Intelligence, Alcatel-Lucent

Data and signaling growth are usually good news for network operators, since growth often translates into higher revenues. But when growth is averaged over a month or quarter, the daily highs and lows of network activity are smoothed out. And signaling spikes remain hidden within the averages. These spikes can overwhelm available signaling capacity, which impairs the customer experience, as well as the operator’s reputation.

What happens when a spike occurs? Typically, a CPU Overload alarm appears on various mobile nodes. And the Network Operations Center (NOC) immediately starts praying that the burst is short-lived and doesn’t go over maximum peak-rate capacity. Because when that happens, all consumers are denied service access. Then, the process of identifying the source of the problem begins. This can be arduous, because it often involves applications completely out of NOC control. And the issue can’t be resolved easily without solid network analytics that enables engagement with application and device developers.

That’s the reason signaling information is a crucial part of the Alcatel-Lucent Mobile Apps Rankings report and why LTE World 2014 devotes an entire pre-conference day to the topic. It’s also why this blog offers a closer look at how some real-world disruptive signaling spikes got started — and were finally resolved.

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The Expanding Channel Programs

Not only do I see more cloud service providers looking to the channel for sales, I see other channel programs expanding....

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When Does WebRTC Need a Media Server? Reason #6

In a recent blog about the current state of WebRTC, I mentioned that readers should check out an excellent white paper...

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The Six Degrees of Mobile Data Plan Innovation: It's Not All About Data- Mobile Voice and Messaging Share Plans Offer Plenty of Appeal

Alcatel-Lucent’s Rich Crowe continues the Six Degrees of Mobile Data Plan Innovation blog series by examining the degree to which consumers are interested in share plans that include unlimited voice and messaging but don’t include data.

The last Six Degrees blog explored consumer attitudes toward two different mobile share plan options: sharing data only and sharing voice, messaging and data. This blog will explore attitudes toward a 3rd option: sharing unlimited voice and messaging — but not data — across multiple devices or subscribers.

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200G Optical Networks: What you need to know

By: Earl Kennedy, IP Transport Product Marketing, Alcatel-Lucent

Optical network operators have already made the move to 100G. But skyrocketing bandwidth demand means many are already pondering what’s next. With a 200G optical solution hitting the market, you probably have questions about when to move to 200G optical – and what you need to know when you make that move.

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The New FCC on Apple about VoIP

August 3, 2009

After Google Voice was rejected by the Apple iPhone store, the new FCC - Chairman Julius Genachowski, and Commissioners Michael Copps, Robert McDowell, Mignon Clyburn, and Meredith Attwell Baker - was prodded into action by Google. The FCC sent a letter to Apple about the GV Rejection. (Read it here). The Letter (DA No. 09-1737) has nine very specific questions to be answered by Apple and AT&T by August 21.

The New FCC also sent a Letter (DA No. 09-1739) to Google concerning Apple's rejection of the Google Voice for iPhone Application.  The questions are not nearly as pointed but are specific.

Verizon Profits Down

July 27, 2009

After dumping New England on Fairpoint and cashing in on that garage sale, Verizon bought Alltel. Now it is dumping more rural lines on Frontier. All of this is just Verizon's way of shoring up its stock report. Without the kickers from the Fairpoint transaction and the spurt from Alltel, my bet is that the company would be showing a loss.

Is Cbeyond in Trouble?

July 27, 2009

On Andrew Left's blog, he points to a 100+ page FTC complaint from customers of Cbeyond. Maybe he isn't familiar with telecom, because most carriers have numerous complaints at the FCC. LNP (porting numbers) is a growing concern which the FCC addressed "Simple Ports" in May. If he thinks, CBEY has a thick file maybe he should check out the consumer complaints against wireless companies on LNP, fees, and contracts.

Left also alleges that CBEY is under a law enforcement investigation. Then he makes a comment about how this should be in an 8-k filing.

Nortel Being Sold Off

July 27, 2009

For those of you who missed it, Nortel is being sold off in pieces.

"Ericsson announced its interest in Nortel's wireless assets late, but it came home the winner, paying $1.13 billion for Nortel's LTE and legacy CDMA business." [Doug]

The Enterprise unit was sold to rival Avaya for $475M. [Reuters]

Radware had previously purchased Nortel Alteon business.

Having sat in a session with Nortel last week, it can't be fun to work there. Worse, it can't be fun to be a Channel Partner. Any residuals are likely gone.







It's an AT&T Monday

July 27, 2009

This week starts with AT&T being sued and boycotted.

First up is STS Telecom's FCC complaint alleging fraud, discrimination, and unfair competitive practices by AT&T. Apparently, the FTC nor DOJ won't accept any anti-trust complaints against the LEC Giants. We don't want to rewind to 1984 do we?

STS Telecom alleges in the complaint that AT&T failed to comply with Congress's much embattled Telecommunications Act of 1996 in refusing to provide STS fair and reasonable access to various telecommunication services. As a result, AT&T severely restricted STS' access to Florida's profitable residential and small business markets.




Is Zer01 Crashing?

July 23, 2009

The deal that was supposed to save VOX Corp. (parent company is Pervasip). After Networld World questioned whether the mobile VoIP service could actually work, the company stripped data from its website (as reported by both PC World and Network World).

PC World further reported, "Earlier this week IDG News Service reported that it's unlikely that Zer01 could be technically able to offer the unlimited mobile voice and data service that it is advertising. The service, originally targeted for a July 1 launch, does not appear to be available yet. In addition, it's being marketed through a multilevel marketing program run by a company called Global Verge whose founder, Mark Petschel, in 2005 pleaded guilty to securities fraud.

The Stimulus Spend is Opportunity

July 23, 2009

I talk with many CLEC's and ISP's that are looking at the BTOP and BIP programs to see if there is opportunity for them. As I said in the podcast with Occam Networks, most of the funds are earmarked for companies already collecting USF funds. Why do I think that? Because it is a safe bet and politics is about safe bets.

I'm attending Tech Data's Technology Solutions Tour. This morning started with TD SVP Pete Peterson discussing how to translate the stimulus spending into technology opportunity.

Add Voice Apps in Minutes

July 22, 2009

Occam Podcast about the NOFA

July 21, 2009

Alphabet Soup in Broadband

July 18, 2009

If you have been even slightly following the Broadband Stimulus program, you will notice that there is an increasing amount of acronyms to keep track of - ARRA, BIP, BTOP, etc. Luckily, here's a glossary from the Knight Center of Digital Excellence.

The key words to know are Unserved and Underserved because that is where the money is earmarked to go. But you have to decide if you will apply for the RUS Broadband Initiatives Program (BIP) for broadband projects in rural areas or for the NTIA Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) for broadband projects in unserved and underserved areas of the United States.

Each program has separate criteria. On a soon to be released podcast with Occam Networks, we discussed much of this.



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