Peter : On Rad's Radar?
Peter
| Peter Radizeski of RAD-INFO, Inc. talking telecom, Cloud, VoIP, CLEC, and The Channel.

spectrum

"Licensed-Lite" White Spaces by WISPA

October 27, 2008

Washington, D.C. - October 27, 2008 - Many Americans, especially those living in rural areas have never had affordable broadband Internet access.  In a letter filed with the FCC last week, WISPA, the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association (www.wispa.org), showed the FCC how it can make valuable TV White Space spectrum available for new services.  The FCC is scheduled to vote on November 4 on how this spectrum can be used after the DTV transition occurs in February 2009.

WISPA offered a detailed "licensed-lite" solution for unused TV channels.  Unlike expensive spectrum auctions and "noisy" unlicensed spectrum, the "licensed-lite" approach relies on a spectrum sharing system that enables all users to operate without interference.  It would benefit the public by allowing the development of new and innovative types of unlicensed broadband devices and services.  It would also benefit WISPs by improving the service range of their existing networks, thereby allowing WISPs to reach new customers.  WISPA's proposal also ensures that consumers will continue to receive over-the-air television signals without interference.

Is Broadband No. 1 in America?

February 23, 2009

CircleID takes a look at America's Broadband Score

"Leonard Waverman, the dean of the Haskayne School of Business at the University of Calgary, describe a measure he developed called the 'Connectivity Scorecard.' It's meant to compare countries on the extent that consumers, businesses and government put communication technology to economically productive use. Even after deducting the untold unproductive hours spent on Facebook and YouTube, the United States comes out on top..."

What's interesting to me is the comments. How no one can find the US Broadband score is funny. (Heard of Google much?) It isn't so much the score as what the score represents.

We have a few problems to fix:

(1) ISP Competition for one.







Alltel Assets Going to AT&T

May 11, 2009

How does this work?
"AT&T Inc said Friday it will buy the bulk of Alltel Wireless assets being divested by Verizon Communications Inc for $2.35 billion, and will sell some Centennial Communications Corp assets to Verizon Wireless for $240 million." [telecomengine]
When they say divest assets, it's suppose to increase competition. Swapping assets between the two biggest players is not what was meant. "Verizon previously had said more than 30 companies had expressed interest in the Alltel assets." I guess only one was REALLY interested.

Windstream Buys ICP

May 11, 2009

 Thanks to the Arkansas Democratic Gazette for the chart.

Despite a big drop in earnings and revenue for the first quarter 2009, Windstream still managed to buy some more lines and customers by snatching up D&E Comm.

D&E Communications is an ICP, an  integrated communications provider, offering residential Voice, Video, Broadband and On-Site Computer Support services as well as business-class Networking, Business Continuity, IT, Security, Voice and Training solutions. D&E is an ILEC and a CLEC.

This stock-and-cash deal (worth about $330M)  "nearly doubles the company's operating presence in Pennsylvania with the addition of approximately 165,000 access lines and about 44,000 high-speed Internet customers."  That's about $2000 per subscriber.

"D&E Communications generated $148 million in revenue and $64 million in operating income before depreciation and amortization (OIBDA) in the twelve months ended March 31, 2009."  So the buy is about 2x Annual Revenue for those hoping to play at home.

"The transaction also includes six wireless licenses for 700 MHz spectrum covering a population of approximately 1.3 million in central Pennsylvania," according to the press release

While Windstream isn't having a strong quarter with dipping revenue, it is doing okay selling Internet and TV.







New Sprint Rumor

September 14, 2009

Engadget has a rumor that Deutsche Telekom is eyeing Sprint Nextel for acquisition. There are a number of issues here:
  1. DT owns T-Mobile.
  2. T-Mobile is GSM and Sprint is iDEN and CDMA. Not much value in mixing that many signaling protocols. No synergy.
  3. FTC and DOJ may not like that much Public Safety being foreign owned.
  4. The cost would be staggering.
By that I mean that DT isn't exactly experiencing huge growth to pay back a multi-billion dollar acquisition of a declining asset.

Open Neutral Fair

November 20, 2009

There are a bunch of debates raging over the telecommunications infrastructure. 

Congress has looked at Open Access bills for cellular networks. By this we mean that a consumer can use any available handset or device on any cell network. This is kind of the Carterphone concept for cellular.

The 700 MHz auction had open access provisions built right in, so VZW's 4G/LTE network will need to incorporate Open Access.

Spectrum is a finite resource. TV, radio, public safety and the cell companies all share access to various licensed spectrums.





Battle of the Maps

November 30, 2009

Cellular companies have some of the lamest ad campaigns. Apparently, the marketing folks AND their ad agencies are SO far removed from the consumers that they don't even know what message to spend millions on.

What difference does a coverage map make to the average consumer? Your phone either works or doesn't. Most folks I know buy a phone based on where they spend the most time.

Ill. Judge Only Smart One

March 12, 2010

Only a single judge in Illinois has the common sense to see that the Frontier-Verizon deal is very similar to the Fairpoint-Verizon deal that resulted in a bankruptcy within 18 months while screwing consumers in three states.

The Herald-Review has a report about "An administrative law judge ruled that the planned sale of Verizon's land-line service to Frontier Communications should not be approved by state regulators.... In her ruling, Administrative Law Judge Lisa M. Tapia says evidence presented in the case in front of the Illinois Commerce Commission doesn't support the sale, primarily because the transaction would leave Frontier too laden with debt to be able to properly manage the lines and other infrastructure."

This was exactly the deal with Fairpoint.

Our Economic Survival

March 25, 2010

The FCC's National Broadband Plan suggests that adding 500 MHz of spectrum to the mix will fix most things. HA!

I thought when Julius became FCC Chair we would have some change. Instead, we get the idea that if we give more spectrum to companies that already have spectrum we will improve the current situation.

Somebody please explain how?

Sprint, Clearwire, T-Mobile, VZW and AT&T have spectrum that they have not turned up yet. Giving them more - and varied - spectrum will not make any marked improvement. 

How many radios do you thing we can add to a cellular handset?







The FCC is Rolling

May 10, 2010

Except for Commissioner McDowell who is out after emergency gall bladder surgery, the FCC has been pumping out the info. The Broadband.gov site is pumping out info. Broadband maps, consumer speed tests, spectrum database, and the Commish's blog. (The website also highlights the 6 Goals of the National Broadband Plan.)

The Commish launched a video message on YouTube about the Third Option on the subject of Net Neutrality.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next
Featured Events