High Tech Investigated, Air Force Cyberwar, Eye-Fi Card, Nintendo Wins, Inbound CNAM

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High Tech Investigated, Air Force Cyberwar, Eye-Fi Card, Nintendo Wins, Inbound CNAM

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the government is "stepping up its investigation into hiring practices at some of America's biggest companies," such as Google, Intel, IBM and Apple.

 Evidently the government's worried that such companies may have agreed not to recruit each others' employees, which the Justice Department sees as a possible violation of antitrust law. It might be "costing skilled computer engineers and other workers opportunities to change jobs for higher pay or better benefits."

Henry Blodget notes that "the government's theory is that the collusion keeps salaries artificially low and that this is as serious a problem as price-fixing," while explaining that "the companies, meanwhile, say they can't very well raid each other's staffs constantly if they ever want to maintain strong business partnerships."

Information Age's Bob Evans hits the nail on the head when he writes "If you ask me, this is a clear sign that the employees at Justice have way too much time on their hands."

Read more here.
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Score one for Nintendo: The video game giant won a ruling in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit against Anascape.

As Reuters reports, Nintendo won a patent appeal on Tuesday in a fight with Anascape over technology used in video game controllers.

Industry observer Kris Graft reported that the Court of Appeals overturned a 2008 ruling by a Texas district court "that required Nintendo to pay Texas-based Anascape $21 million for allegedly infringing on video game controller patents."

Nintendo said that the Court of Appeals found that none of Nintendo's video game controllers infringe on Anascape's patent 6,906,700, "3D Controller With Vibration," Graft reported.

Read more here.
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 If you're into "little gizmos" for shutterbugs, check out the Eye-Fi card.

As industry observer Christopher Null writes, "the Eye-Fi looks like any old SD storage card, but in reality it's much, much more." He describes it as "a tiny wireless radio inside your camera," letting you do without the hassles of the cord or from having to take the card out and put it into your PC.

The Eye-Fi's been around for a while. It lets you upload your photos to your computer automatically and wirelessly "whenever you snap them," Null says: "If you want, it will also send them to Flickr, Facebook, or just about anywhere else."

Now the Eye-Fi Pro X2 is hitting the market, what Null describes as "the third major revision of the Eye-Fi hardware," and "its biggest update yet." He took it for a test drive and gives a quick rundown of some of the features and how well they actually work in real life.

Read more here.
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Flying into the 21st century, the United States Air Force has announced that it will "train all new recruits in the basics of cyberwarfare," four-star Gen. Robert Kehler said Monday.

The Associated Press notes that "details are still being worked out on a cyberwarfare component for basic training, but it would be brief, perhaps an hour or two total, and would cover only the fundamentals."

A more advanced, undergraduate-level training program will begin in June to train officers and enlisted personnel for a new Air Force career field in cyber operations, Kehler told the AP.

Kehler heads the Air Force Space Command, which oversees the Air Force's cyberwar operations, at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs. He told the AP that the basic training component would cover such basic precautions as using firewalls and passwords:

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VoIP Innovations is a vendor offering a service called Inbound CNAM.

Marketing it to the wholesale VoIP market, company officials describe Inbound CNAM as a tool which "lets you see the name of the person or company who is calling before you answer."

Company officials say they use the national telecom database to look up the name, "before we send the call to your device and charge you a per-DID rate." VoIP Innovations then stores CNAM information in national caller ID database.

Other vendors offer the service as well. Last year TMC's Tom Keating blogged about EZ Call's announcement of the launch of EZCallerID.com, a new service that provides enhanced Caller ID, also known as CNAM, for VoIP calls.

Read more here.


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