Peter : On Rad's Radar?
Peter
| Peter Radizeski of RAD-INFO, Inc. talking telecom, Cloud, VoIP, CLEC, and The Channel.

duopoly

Debt and Finances

August 16, 2010

I'll readily admit that I am not a financial wizard. I am risk adverse and think that playing the stock market is like a casino (the deck is stacked against you). Then I read The Big Short by Michael Lewis and I was amazed that most of the Players on The Street don't know more than me, except they know when the rats are bailing a ship, so they can too.

That being said, I wonder how we have developed such an over leveraged Industry.

Losses All The Way Around

July 27, 2010

What a terrible quarter. 

The FCC is playing around with Broadband - plans, definitions and classifications. The NTIA took the summer off from its task on the broadband stimulus. 

Meanwhile, VZ releases its quarterly numbers as a loss due to pension payments and layoffs. It is planning more layoffs, because it has to cut head count in its wireline business to reflect the declining revenue. The spin was that VZW was counter-balancing any revenue losses, but with wholesale (pre-paid) cellular subs, not direct, contract ones.



ReClassify the FCC

July 27, 2010

You have thousands calling for reclassification of broadband service by the FCC. In other words, let's regulate broadband. As if that will help. More government red tape. Regulation didn't get CLEC's to develop a viable model in 14 years, so what will change with more regulation?

Dave Rusin, CEO at AFS, sold his company to Zayo, I think, to spend more time blogging about changes needed to both the FCC and CLEC strategy.

Things are Round and Round

July 15, 2010

As one door closes, right? Well, WISPA is putting together a deal with DirecTV so that it's mainly residential wireless ISP base can grab some cash switching people from cable TV and Internet to fixed wireless internet access and satellite TV - kind of a cut the cable promotion. 

It used to be that independent ISP's had to worry mainly about the ILEC, but in the residential (consumer) market, the worry is cable - Comcast, Cox, TWC, BrightHouse, CableVision and Charter.

The funny thing is that some of the MSO's are collapsing their wholesale division. Just like the ILEC's, the MSO's don't really want someone else to own the customer. So even as Charter opens up its wholesale cable modem program to FISPA members, I have to wonder how long it will be in existence.

Channel Partners Expo in Boston in 2008 when the cable guys were all lined up on a panel handing out crumbs of info about their newly developed channel program, all anyone wanted to know was how much commission and would there be an added spiff.





Verizon Starts Blocking

June 9, 2010

Comcast won in court over the FCC on the issue of traffic shaping, so Verizon started blocking ports this week.

First, VZ started blocking port 25 yesterday on their FiOS and DSL networks. Now VoIP Traffic is being blocked.

From an ITSP, "We started getting calls today, and it seems that Verizon has started blocking ports, traffic shaping, something, but it is interfering with voice service, email, and some web traffic.

Metered Data Begins

June 2, 2010

TWC and AT&T both trialed metered Internet access over wireline broadband. As far as I know, both trials were not that successful.

The big issue for ISP's is that the bandwidth consumption keeps increasing (as the Internet becomes the communication avenue as well as entertainment and news outlet). This doesn't bode well for Duopoly revenue long-term. Why? 

AT&T and VZ are spending a fortune to deliver TV via tripple-play to consumers.



Re-Title the Internet

May 4, 2010

Last Friday, FCC Chairman Genachowski received a letter from three law professors, all experts on telecommunications law and open Internet rules. "Tim Wu (known for first popularizing the concept of Network Neutrality), Susan Crawford (former White House advisor on telecommunications policy), and Marvin Ammori (lead attorney and representative of intervenors in the FCC's Comcast proceeding and court appeal), called on the FCC to reclassify broadband transmission service as a Title II telecommunications service." [save-the-internet]

Since AT&T blogged about it without mentioning Crawford's name, I know that the spin machine is in effect. But the FCC must act fast before the Duopoly can mount a PR campaign and a war machine.  I'm a firm believer that anything that a Fortune 1000 company lobbies against is best for the consumer. And every time AT&T wants anything, it usually means it's time to reach for the KY. 

For a detailed legal explanation of why broadband was never classified as a Title II telecommunications service, read this.

Of course, the re-classification would be fought, but so what?





The Gap

March 11, 2010

There's a gap of about 93 million Americas who do have Internet Access (of any kind - not even dialup! I can't even wrap my head around that). The FCC is on a mission to bridge that gap.

Commissioner Clyburn's statement was informative, especially about the proposed "National Digital Literacy Corps in order to help individuals who are unfamiliar with or intimidated by the on-line world develop the skills they need to be comfortable on-line and to take full advantage of all it has to offer." Like a help desk.

Broadband is Flattening

January 12, 2010

Pike & Fischer survey shows that broadband is flattening. (I wrote a little about this yesterday). This means a couple of things:

One, customer acquisition costs of broadband is going to increase AND margins will shrink, because it also means short term pricing will drop. (Price war coming ...

Fostering Broadband Competition

December 29, 2009

One of the Broadband Stimulus grants (at $33M) went to North Georgia Network Cooperative. ComputerWorld is all atwitter because this grant means that NGNC will compete with Windstream, which already offers 10Mb to 100MB Internet Access in that region. And "Windstream covers about 70 percent of the area that North Georgia Network Cooperative proposes to cover using government money".

The irony is that pundits are criticizing the FCC's new National Broadband Policy precisely because it does NOT include any measures to increase competition for broadband. Now one of the few grants approved actually will increase broadband competition in Dawsonville and the surrounding area and one media outlet is upset.

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