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Benefits of Standardization in the Internet of Things

By: Tim Carey, Industry Standards Manager of Alcatel-Lucent’s Customer Experience Division

The world of M2M is changing as solutions move from single purpose devices that transmit data to and receive commands from an application in the network to an Internet of Things where solutions permit devices to be multi-purpose and applications to be collaborative.

The Internet of Things can benefit from global standardization efforts that:

  • Enable deployment of standards compliant devices and applications with no or minimal customization thereby expanding the applicable device ecosystem and reducing deployment time
  • Provide an ecosystem that readily allow applications to share information and experiences
  • Provide an environment where communication occurs securely and the privacy and confidentiality of the user is maintained

Full Story »

Benefits of Standardization in the Internet of Things

By: Tim Carey, Industry Standards Manager of Alcatel-Lucent’s Customer Experience Division

The world of M2M is changing as solutions move from single purpose devices that transmit data to and receive commands from an application in the network to an Internet of Things where solutions permit devices to be multi-purpose and applications to be collaborative.

The Internet of Things can benefit from global standardization efforts that:

  • Enable deployment of standards compliant devices and applications with no or minimal customization thereby expanding the applicable device ecosystem and reducing deployment time
  • Provide an ecosystem that readily allow applications to share information and experiences
  • Provide an environment where communication occurs securely and the privacy and confidentiality of the user is maintained

Full Story »

Successful Communications Services Have Six Features in Common

By: Mae Kowalke, TMCnet Contributor

Large enterprises increasingly resemble public network service providers as they manage access, transport and network routing while controlling devices and sessions. Whether businesses build their own or buy their communications services through a public provider, the IP communications architectures are looking remarkably similar.

“I’ve noticed that both private service operators (CIOs of large enterprises) and public service providers are implementing very similar solutions around the globe,” wrote Oliver Krahn in a recent TechZine article, 6 Steps that Improve Communications Services.
ALUSnip10.14.2.JPGSource: Alcatel-Lucent

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Most Mobile Traffic Happens In-Building, and Operators Need to Beef Up Their Support

By: Mae Kowalke, TMCnet Contributor

Most mobile traffic is consumed indoors, and operators need to get a better grip on serving this market since it is a huge one.

Roughly 80 percent of mobile traffic is now consumed in-building, according to a recent Gartner study, whether mobile bandwidth is consumed in a public space, a shopping mall, or at the office. The total market for in-building services is estimated to be $4.3 billion currently, according to ABI research, and it is expected to grow to $8.5 billion by 2019.

Business leaders recognize the need, too; 72 percent of businesses are interested in enterprise cells that can boost performance on their premises. An Alcatel-Lucent infographic tells the tale.

Full Story »

Most Mobile Traffic Happens In-Building, and Operators Need to Beef Up Their Support

By: Mae Kowalke, TMCnet Contributor

Most mobile traffic is consumed indoors, and operators need to get a better grip on serving this market since it is a huge one.

Roughly 80 percent of mobile traffic is now consumed in-building, according to a recent Gartner study, whether mobile bandwidth is consumed in a public space, a shopping mall, or at the office. The total market for in-building services is estimated to be $4.3 billion currently, according to ABI research, and it is expected to grow to $8.5 billion by 2019.

Business leaders recognize the need, too; 72 percent of businesses are interested in enterprise cells that can boost performance on their premises. An Alcatel-Lucent infographic tells the tale.

Full Story »

What is TADS all about?

On November 12 and 13 TADS will happen.  TADS bills itself in the following way: “TADSummit (TADS) is focused on building...

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Will George Clooney's Wedding Popularize Burner Phones in Your Company?

This morning, news broke that even more celebrity nude photos of have leaked and that George Clooney handed out burner phones to...

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Treo 650

October 25, 2004

Treo 650

The palmOne Treo 650 may be one of most "hyped" smartphones ever - with the anticipation causing more than just the casual phone geek to drool at the prospect at owning one of these puppies. The Treo 650 is an upgrade to the Treo 600, one of the most beloved smart phones -- which struck a nice balance of cell phone and PDA functionality with great integration of the two. Rumors about the Treo 650's feature-set have swirled around the Internet, but with the launch today, those rumors can be put to rest. Like the Treo 600, the Treo 650 gives you just what you need to stay productive and in-touch, including phone, email, Palm OS organizer, web, messaging, MultiMediaCard/SD/SDIO expansion and a built-in camera.

Wi-LAN Launches Mobilis

October 25, 2004

Mobilis, apparently has a new mobile wireless solution for commuter trains using WiMAX. I've always read that WiMAX has problems with any sort of high velocity or movement. Though since velocity (or speed) is all relative (read Albert Einstein's theory of relativity), I suppose if the transmitters are installed on the train, then even though you are travelling at high-speed, the WiMAX transmission signals will be travelling "relative" to the passengers speed.

Of course, then the question becomes, how do they get high-speed wireless signals from off the train?

My Ultimate ATA (Analog Telephone Adaptor)

October 25, 2004

I've seen and played around with lots of ATAs (or some prefer TA for short), which are used by broadband VoIP providers, such as Vonage, AT&T CallVantage, Lingo, Broadvoice, Packet8, etc.

With so many ATAs on the market, it got me thinking, "What would I like to see in the feature-set of the 'ultimate ATA'?"

Well, here's my feature-set for "My Ultimate ATA":
1) Support for the G.729a codec simultaneously on BOTH ports.
Many ATAs only support this compression codec on one port
2) Not locked down or password protected.
Many ITSPs, such as Vonage, lock/password-protect their devices.



AT&T CallVantage Public Company, Private VoIP Numbers

October 21, 2004

I recently wrote that someone asked me if I knew what the AT&T CallVantage (VoIP) customer numbers were.

He said that the number of AT&T's CallVantage customers "SUCK so badly compared to VONAGE who is kicking AT&T around the block on voip numbers."

I also wrote, "AT&T is a public company, so I would assume their SEC filings would contain the information about how many CallVantage customers they have. Anyone want to volunteer to read their SEC filing report and report back here?"

Well someone indeed volunteered to check out their SEC filing and emailed me with:
"why did AT&T NOT break out VoIP numbers in the quarterly report??"
Answer: "cause they suck????"



I'm with him. A public company hiding its VoIP numbers from it's shareholders?

Atonics to embed Popular Telephony's P2P VoIP Technology

October 21, 2004

Another win for Popular Telephony with an Asian company called Atonics, Inc., a leading designer of combined Wi-Fi VoIP solutions based out of Taiwan...

As you know from reading my blog, Popular Telephony is a P2P serverless VoIP solution that supports SIP, H.323, can reach the PSTN or even call Skype users. If your not familiar, I suggest you go read Popular Telephony's Peerio a Skype Killer?

Here is today's announcement of the win for Popular Telephony...

POPULAR TELEPHONY AND ATONICS PARTNER TO PROVIDE FIXED AND WIRELESS SERVERLESS TELEPHONY SOLUTIONS

October 20, 2004 Popular Telephony Inc., the telecommunications middleware company behind the Peerio serverless communications invention, today announced their first ever product licensing agreement in Asia with Taiwan based Atonics Inc., one of the industry’s leading designers of combined Wi-Fi VoIP solutions.

Voiceglo VoIP Surpasses More Than 1.8 Million Users

October 20, 2004

Thought I would share an email I literally just received, which has some VoIP numbers that contradict the Yankee Group's overall industry VoIP numbers. Yankee Group claims 1 million TOTAL VoIP subscribers by years end. This release itself states 1.8 million VoiceGlo VoIP users which already supercedes that without even including other VoIP players.

The email also contained a news release worth checking out.

AOL and Dial-Up VoIP Update

October 20, 2004

Update to my AOL and Dial-UP VoIP blog entry:

A source told me that AOL's plans are indeed for broadband not dial-up. Here's my take on it... First, AOL isn't a "true" broadband provider. In fact, they used to resell cable modems and DSL access then get people to sign-up for a broadband provider and AOL.

Pretec 12 GB Compact Flash card

October 20, 2004

Pretec 12GB CompactFlash Card

Just read a funny commentary on Pretec's new 12GB CF card - apparently it will cost more than a new Honda Civic - $14.900! YIKES! Somebody would really have to be an ultimate geek to require that amount of storage and pay that price. Excuse me a moment while I call my home equity loan officer...

FCC's Michael Powell and VoIP Regulation

October 20, 2004

FCC Chairman Michael Powell

FCC Chairman Michael Powell said Tuesday that he would seek broad regulatory authority for the federal government over Voice over Internet telephone services to avoid stifling the VoIP market.

Powell told an audience at an industry conference that letting states regulate VoIP would lead to conflicting regulations and stifle competition. In my opinion, the spaghetti of telecom regulation rules helped the traditional carriers hold a tight grip on the telecom industry for decades. So I agree with Powell and I feel that regulating VoIP today would no doubt require a future VoIP Telecom Act equivalent to the Telecommunications Deregulation Act of 1996 if we permit regulations to “infest” the VoIP industry.

AOL and Dial-Up VoIP

October 20, 2004

America Online is in process of testing a flat-rate/month VoIP service, utilizing Level3’s network as it seeks to help stem the increasing customer defection. The service will launch in 2005.

As broadband connections in the United States continue to rise, the need for predominantly dial-up ISPs, such as AOL diminishes. I am assuming that AOL will attempt to provide “dial-up VoIP” so they can offer a competitive price-point that will put a tourniquet on the customer blood letting.

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