Jim Machi : Industry Insight
Jim Machi

How to Get AT&T to Fund Your IoT Idea

IoT and M2M developers - here is some exciting news.It Isn't that often that you can develop something for what is supposed...

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Access is Still Pretty Good

At all the shows, it is cloud this and cloud that - a bunch of doom and gloom on legacy telecom....

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Mobile fax? Why do you need that?

Fax is an enduring technology. While you may think that fax is declining, some reports show that the market is actually...

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We ask the experts: How can exceptional QoE be achieved in VoLTE networks?

By: Jean Jones, Director, Wireless Marketing, Alcatel-Lucent

What does voice over LTE (VoLTE) offer your subscribers? Better voice quality, including HD voice. Rich communications with messaging and video. And whatever inventive applications you choose to introduce. In other words, VoLTE can provide a superior quality of experience (QoE) for subscribers and give you a competitive edge — particularly when your service operates at its best. 

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In my last blog[CCE1] , our experts explained why an end-to-end strategy is the key to maintaining peak VoLTE performance. Now we’ll look at how this strategy gets put into practice to optimize real-world service offerings. The information here is based on interviews with Luis Venerio who works with our VoLTE Readiness Services team. And his observations come straight from his experience on VoLTE deployments that serve millions of subscribers.

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Wearable Tech Expo 2014 Kicking off in NYC

My team is at the Jacob Javits Center setting up for Wearable Tech Expo 2014 which will take place Wednesday and Thursday...

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When Does WebRTC Need a Media Server? Reason #7

Tsahi Levent-Levi’s white paper, “Seven Reasons for WebRTC Server-Side Processing,” details a variety of WebRTC-related scenarios that necessitate a media server....

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How signaling spikes affect networks: 3 real-world examples

By: Josee Loudiadis, Director of Network Intelligence, Alcatel-Lucent

Data and signaling growth are usually good news for network operators, since growth often translates into higher revenues. But when growth is averaged over a month or quarter, the daily highs and lows of network activity are smoothed out. And signaling spikes remain hidden within the averages. These spikes can overwhelm available signaling capacity, which impairs the customer experience, as well as the operator’s reputation.

What happens when a spike occurs? Typically, a CPU Overload alarm appears on various mobile nodes. And the Network Operations Center (NOC) immediately starts praying that the burst is short-lived and doesn’t go over maximum peak-rate capacity. Because when that happens, all consumers are denied service access. Then, the process of identifying the source of the problem begins. This can be arduous, because it often involves applications completely out of NOC control. And the issue can’t be resolved easily without solid network analytics that enables engagement with application and device developers.

That’s the reason signaling information is a crucial part of the Alcatel-Lucent Mobile Apps Rankings report and why LTE World 2014 devotes an entire pre-conference day to the topic. It’s also why this blog offers a closer look at how some real-world disruptive signaling spikes got started — and were finally resolved.

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PacketMan Re-Emerges

September 13, 2011

Back in 2002, before blogs, Twitter and Facebook, a key way to get your message across was to write articles.  I wrote a monthly article for many years for the famously yellow-colored Internet Telephony Magazine.  Things are a little different now – while there is still a yellow-colored Internet Telephony Magazine and there still is an IT Expo, TMC corporation, who runs both of those, now has a very, very large website, runs webinars, and hosts bloggers.  So the magazine is one of their properties as opposed to the main key property. 

Numbed by Analyst Research - What I Did on My Summer Vacation

September 6, 2011

I spent the summer engorged in analyst research.  It was all over my office.  It was in my briefcase.  It was on my computer and iPad.  It was in my head. 

So What's the Deal with User Experience Convergence?

August 30, 2011

In my last blog, I talked about the effects that convergence may have on the future.  This week, I’d like to address the factors that need to be considered when it comes to user experience convergence.  First of all, the delivery network needs to be context-aware.  For example, what is the type of end-point being used (since you don’t want to send 720P to a CIF device)?  

The Next Wave in Communications Convergence

August 23, 2011

Last week, I wrote about the pro and cons of convergence.  But what does the future hold because of convergence?  Due to the capability of the converged networks, hosted offerings have morphed into cloud computing offerings and we have seen communication-based cloud computing offerings emerge.  Cloud computing is about a $100B business, split between SaaS, PaaS and IaaS, with VoIP/UC accounting for $5B. 

Challenges and Opportunities Abound When it Comes to Convergence

August 16, 2011

In my last blog, I discussed the history of convergence and how it’s affected the telecom industry.  Now, I’d like to talk about the pros and cons of convergence.

Let’s start with the cons.

A Little Background on Communications Convergence

August 9, 2011

Communications convergence has taken many forms, some of which are still going on today.  One key convergence from the 1980’s involved the converging of open-systems based computing with telecommunications.  The computer-telephony integration (CTI) industry was born, and from that, Dialogic emerged as a key player.   The economics of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware in the form of servers and communication boards, with the open-systems, open API approach yielded best-of-breed applications and solutions. 

Outbound Notification in the IP World

August 2, 2011

We’ve all had experience with some kind of outbound notification system – maybe a machine calling to inform you that your childen’s school has been closed due to a snowstorm, or some IT triggered alert about your website, or a very sincere recorded voice calling you right at dinnertime during election season.  Generally, there are two types of outbound notification systems – the commercial ones such as above, or an emergency notification, which includes crisis alerts.  The crisis alerts form a part of the Public Safety segment, which I recently wrote a blog about.

The Changing Face of Emergency Calling

July 26, 2011

The FCC estimates that 70% of 911 calls are placed by wireless callers.  Couple that with the increase in VoIP phone services, and you can quickly see that the majority of 911 calls are no longer coming from wired lines that are associated with specific addresses.  Additionally, with the increased capability of wireless networks, whether 3G or 4G, and with the capability of VoIP networks, one can also see that data, images, and video can also potentially be transmitted in a 911 “call” to a PSAP (Public Safety Answering Point). 

The Internet and FoIP and Fax in the Clouds

July 19, 2011




Faxing is alive and well these days.  The movement of Fax over IP similar to the movement of Voice over IP is occurring.  Fax over IP (FoIP) is a growing trend, expecting to be a $415M business in 2014, according to Davidson Consulting

It may be amazing to some readers that faxing still occurs. 




HD Calling

July 12, 2011

Nope, neither the Home Depot nor Harley Davidson is calling you.  But it is increasingly likely someone will be calling you using High Definition (HD) Voice.  For you Clash fans, possibly even London may be calling since HD Voice is now available in the UK.   In fact, according to a June report from the GSA, HD Voice is now available on 20 mobile networks in 18 countries. 

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